99
99

PROPERTY OF A LADY

Anne Redpath, R.S.A., A.R.A.
POPPIES
Estimate
80,000120,000
LOT SOLD. 103,250 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
99

PROPERTY OF A LADY

Anne Redpath, R.S.A., A.R.A.
POPPIES
Estimate
80,000120,000
LOT SOLD. 103,250 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Scottish Sale

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London

Anne Redpath, R.S.A., A.R.A.
1895-1965
POPPIES

Provenance

Acquired directly from the artist for the mother of the present owner;
Thence by descent

Catalogue Note

The present work was painted circa 1950 and is a striking combination of the subtle palette synonymous with Redpath's work of the previous decade, and the more vibrant colouring of the 1950s and beyond.  The background, dominated by greys, mauves and whites, provides a harmonious backdrop for the fresh blue lupins, purple marguerites and striking crimson poppies which are arranged casually in a blue and white jug. This simple subject matter belies the avant garde method of Redpath's style. In the abstract expressionist tradition, the surface of the painting is evenly treated and although there are discernable differences to the background, they are left undefined. The impact of the composition is further enhanced by the steeply angled perspective; this is a regular element of Redpath's work and propels the still life towards the viewer. A recollection by Derek Clarke, a contemporary of Redpaths in the Hanover Street Group, provides a revealing insight into how these effects were achieved in practice '...walking back and forth, turning suddenly to spring a surprise on the image and catch it unawares, screwing up her eyes to diffuse the focus and generalise the image...she was at every stage concerned with the whole of the painting rather than concentrating on a small area'. 

The still life dominated Redpath's work in the 1950s with nearly half her exhibits of the period following the same theme. Many of the objects used, like the blue and white jug in the present work, were used repeatedly and were often purchased from Gordon Small's shop on Prince's street. Redpath had moved from Hawick to Edinburgh in 1949, with her sons David and Alistair, taking a house in Mayfield Gardens. She soon became an integral part of the Edinburgh art scene and was the first woman to be elected to the Royal Scottish Academy in 1952. She enjoyed a solo show at The Lefevre Gallery in London the same year and her standing was such that she lectured on behalf of the Arts Council and wrote for The Scotsman; the May 1950 edition of Vogue described her as 'a social centre for Edinburgh's Art world'. Her humanity reached far beyond painters however; a neighbour on London street, where she settled in 1952, wrote to her son following her death and described her as '...not just a painter, but someone infinitely kind and humourous, and an hilarious raconteur...I really loved her. I never, ever heard her complain about anything or be nasty about anyone'. Following her death her in 1965 Sir William MacTaggart referred to Anne Redpath as 'something of a legend'.

The Scottish Sale

|
London