9
9
Roger Hilton
OCTOBER 1955
Estimate
40,00060,000
LOT SOLD. 103,250 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
9
Roger Hilton
OCTOBER 1955
Estimate
40,00060,000
LOT SOLD. 103,250 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Robert Devereux Collection of Post-War British Art in aid of the African Arts Trust, Sale 1

|
London

Roger Hilton
1911 - 1975
OCTOBER 1955
signed and dated Oct '55 on the reverse
oil on canvas
112 by 86cm.; 44 by 34in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Waddington Galleries, London, where acquired by Dr. Charles Damiano
Waddington Galleries, London, where acquired by Ken Powell Esq.
Austin/Desmond Fine Art, London, where acquired by the present owner in March 2004

Exhibited

Minneapolis, Minneapolis Institute of Arts, European Art Today: 35 Painters and Sculptors, cat. no.159.506, 1959, with British Council tour to Los Angeles, San Francisco, North Carolina, Ottawa, New York and Baltimore, catalogue untraced;
Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, Contemporary British Paintings (Middle East), 1965, with British Council tour to Cairo, Alexandria and Gibraltar, catalogue untraced;
London, Arts Council of Great Britain, Roger Hilton, 1974, cat. no.25;
London, Serpentine Gallery, Roger Hilton: Paintings and Drawings 1931-1973, 1st - 31st March 1974, cat. no.25;
London, Hayward Gallery, The South Bank Centre, Roger Hilton, 4th November - 6th February 1994, cat. no.21, with tour to Birmingham, Ikon Gallery and the University of Manchester, The Whitworth Art Gallery.


 

Literature

Andrew Lambirth, Roger Hilton: The Figured Language of Thought, Thames and Hudson, London, 2007, illustrated p.97.

Catalogue Note

Schooled in the formal abstraction of post-war Paris, Hilton's work employs a level of bravura which, when at its best, is truly stunning. In his abstract works, simplified forms which carry with them no implicit figurative references dive back and forth across the canvas, using only a gift for placement and paint manipulation to achieve their effect. Often incorporating a free charcoal over-drawing into the finished images and using the simplest of palettes, his paintings become images representative primarily of an emotional expression.

Whilst at first glance, this can appear to engender a relatively limited repertoire, one only need look at the failure of so many of his peers to achieve in their own abstract work the level of release seen in Hilton's paintings to understand why for many he is considered one of the most consistently adventurous and talented artists of his generation.

The Robert Devereux Collection of Post-War British Art in aid of the African Arts Trust, Sale 1

|
London