8
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Victor Pasmore, R.A.
ABSTRACT IN WHITE, BLACK AND MAROON
JUMP TO LOT
8
Victor Pasmore, R.A.
ABSTRACT IN WHITE, BLACK AND MAROON
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Robert Devereux Collection of Post-War British Art in aid of the African Arts Trust, Sale 1

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London

Victor Pasmore, R.A.
1908-1998
ABSTRACT IN WHITE, BLACK AND MAROON

relief construction with painted wood and perspex


66 by 74cm.; 26 by 29in.
Executed in 1956, the present work is one of three variants of the same composition in slightly differing sizes.
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Provenance

The Estate of the Artist
Marlborough Fine Art, London, where acquired by the present owner in December 2004

Exhibited

Possibly Venice, XXX Venice Biennale, 1960, with tour to Paris, Brussels, Amsterdam, Bolchum, Belgrade, Oslo and Copenhagen;
Possibly Hanover, Kestner-Gesellschaft, Retrospective Exhibition, 1962;
Possibly Zurich, Galerie Charles Lienhard, 1963.

Literature

Alan Bowness and Luigi Lambertini, Victor Pasmore, Thames and Hudson, London, 1980, cat. no.193. 

Catalogue Note

Although Pasmore had made his first crucial break with figuration in the paintings of 1948-49, the process by which he achieved full abstraction took some time and in statements of the period the artist often takes great pains to ensure that his constructed abstraction was not seen as derived from a subject. In about 1951 he began to make relief constructions, partly in an attempt to further distance himself from the suggestions of landscape that some saw as residual in his work. The early reliefs were very home-made, and few survive in their original state, being either substantially reworked by the artist or dismantled later. However, his interest in the use of industrial materials was growing, and with the precedents of Gabo, Moholy-Nagy and Biederman, it is not surprising that Pasmore began to experiment with a new array of materials, and it is clear from the photographs that do record these experimental pieces that metals and plastics, both clear and coloured, are major components. It appears that he intended certain pieces to be produced as editions, but as selling even one piece was proving difficult, the potential expense was prohibitive. However, as Lawrence Alloway highlighted in his particularly illuminating article for Art News in 1955 (published in 1956), the success of these works lay in that fact that the balance and composition of each piece was in a constant state of flux around the base motifs.

The Robert Devereux Collection of Post-War British Art in aid of the African Arts Trust, Sale 1

|
London