21
21
Patrick Caulfield
LES DEMOISELLES D'AVIGNON VUES DE DERRIÈRE
Estimate
8,00012,000
LOT SOLD. 14,375 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
21
Patrick Caulfield
LES DEMOISELLES D'AVIGNON VUES DE DERRIÈRE
Estimate
8,00012,000
LOT SOLD. 14,375 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Robert Devereux Collection of Post-War British Art in aid of the African Arts Trust, Sale 1

|
London

Patrick Caulfield
1936 - 2005
LES DEMOISELLES D'AVIGNON VUES DE DERRIÈRE
signed and numbered 63/65
screenprint in colours
plate: 106 by 92 cm.; 41¾ by 36¼in.; sheet: 132 by 111.5cm.; 52 by 44in.
Executed in 1999, the present work is from an edition of 65 with 14 artist's proofs.

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Provenance

Alan Cristea Gallery, London, where acquired by the present owner in November 2003

Literature

Alan Cristea, Mel Gooding, and Kathleen Dempsey, Patrick Caulfield: The Complete Prints 1964-1999, Alan Cristea Gallery, London, 1998, cat. no.90, illustrated pp.79, 96 (another from the same edition).

Catalogue Note

'It seemed to me that Picasso had pulled the plug on interpreting the human form...'
The Artist interviewed by Bryan Robertson, quoted in Patrick Caulfield, exh.cat., Hayward Gallery, London, 1999, p. 26.

In Les Demoiselles d'Avignon Vues de Derrière Caulfield pays homage to Pablo Picasso, the progenitor of Cubism whose formal innovations and investigations of pictorial space so profoundly inspired the younger artist's own aesthetic. With characteristic visual wit, Caulfield rephrases Picasso's 1907 painting of Spanish prostitutes, a work which marked the beginning of Cubism and which is considered by many today to be the very cornerstone of Modernism. In Caulfield's version, however, he reverses Picasso's image so that instead of viewing the women frontally, we peer at them from behind. Caulfield's unorthodox modification of his source is both a visual pun on the printing process - which reverses the original design - and a verbal pun on the French word derrière, which means rear end. Beyond this playful contrariness which is essential to the artist's spirit, Caulfield's composition packs a conceptual punch as the unexpected viewpoint of such a well known image forces us to reconsider the very act of looking at art.

The Robert Devereux Collection of Post-War British Art in aid of the African Arts Trust, Sale 1

|
London