72
72
Greene, Nathanael, Continental General
Estimate
6,0008,000
LOT SOLD. 16,250 USD
JUMP TO LOT
72
Greene, Nathanael, Continental General
Estimate
6,0008,000
LOT SOLD. 16,250 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: MAGNIFICENT AMERICAN HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS: FIRST SELECTION

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New York

Greene, Nathanael, Continental General
Autograph letter signed ("N Greene"), 4 pages (8 5/8 x 7 1/4 in.; 219 x 184 mm), "Headquarters" (west of Charleston, South Carolina), 10 March 1782, to Count Rochambeau; second leaf inlaid, partly separated at fold, a few spots of ink erosion. Half-morocco drop-box.
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Provenance

Elsie O. and Philip D. Sang Foundation (sale, Sotheby Parke Bernet, 20 June 1979, lot 700)

Literature

Conrad & Parks, eds., The Papers of General Nathanael Greene, vol. 10

Catalogue Note

The American commander disagrees with the commander of the French expeditionary force on matters of strategy. The surrender of General Cornwallis in October 1781, did not mean the end of the war for the combatants; his was only the weakest of three British divisions, the British still held New York, Wilmington, Savannah and Charleston. After Yorktown, Rochambeau quartered his army in Williamsburg where he awaited news from Europe in response to the victory, and refused Greene's request for aid in attacking Charleston.

General Greene writes: "I have attended to your reasoning on the general plan of operations and with all respect to your superior judgment I cannot help dissenting from you in opinion. It has ever been my opinion that the best mode of defending the center of the United States is to support the extremes. This opinion might be supported from a number of forceable reasons. But besides the reasons ... we ought to pay some regard to the rights of individuals and the claims of particular states who have embarked in the dispute from full assurances of protection and support."

He expresses regret that Rochambeau has set his Legion in motion but not to aid at Charleston "... as it will alarm the enemy at New York and induce them to detach in consequence thereof." He expects the war in America to continue especially in the southern states, and goes on to report on an engagement between a British detachment from Charleston and troops under the command of General Francis Marion.

The JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: MAGNIFICENT AMERICAN HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS: FIRST SELECTION

|
New York