67
67
Gerry, Elbridge, Signer of the Declaration of Independence from Massachusetts
Estimate
8,00012,000
LOT SOLD. 6,875 USD
JUMP TO LOT
67
Gerry, Elbridge, Signer of the Declaration of Independence from Massachusetts
Estimate
8,00012,000
LOT SOLD. 6,875 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: MAGNIFICENT AMERICAN HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS: FIRST SELECTION

|
New York

Gerry, Elbridge, Signer of the Declaration of Independence from Massachusetts
Autograph letter signed ("El. Gerry"), 3 pages on a bifolium (8 1/4 x 6 1/2 in.; 210 x 165 mm), Philadelphia, 7 July 1777, to an unnamed addressee [James Warren], docketed on verso of second leaf in Warren's hand "Mr. Gerrys Lettr July 7 1777"; formerly folded, second leaf inlaid, the two leaves detached but joined, lower edge of first leaf guarded, small section of blank portion of second leaf renewed, two other tiny mends at folds.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Literature

Smith, P.H., ed., Letters of Delegates to Congress, vol. 25 (1998), pp. 627-628

Catalogue Note

Gerry complains to Warren about the defense of Ticonderoga.

Gerry (1744–1814) as member of the Continental Congress is writing to his old friend Warren (whom he met as a member of the Massachusetts General Court and as a follower of Samuel Adams), having not yet heard of the evacuation of Fort Ticonderoga (5 July) by General Arthur St. Clair. He writes: "Since my last nothing new occurs, save ye approach of ye Enemy towards Ticonderoga. By returns from General St. Clair of ye 25th June, it appears that ye eleven Battalions ordered from New Hamshire[sic] & Massachusetts Bay, which should contain near 8000 men, are very deficient, insomuch that he then had but 2000 effective men rank & file to defend that important post. This is so inadequate to the Force that will be brot against it, if the Enemy means to attack, that We have no other prospect but the Loss of the post, & I fear the Cause that will be said to be the Deficiency of the Batalions mentioned."

But Gerry tries to put a good face on the prospect: "I think however that they will finally have Reason to repent an Event that they may now consider as advantageous, if the Militia of those States exert themselves with their wanted Spirit. The great Advantages arising to a State from such a Spirit have not only been realized by the Massachusetts Bay, & South Carolina, but also by the Jersies, which has been found by the Enemy too warm a Climate for a longer residence."

He refers to the Pennsylvania Test Act, one of many such acts passed by the states to require oaths of allegiance, inclosing a copy with the letter (not now present). In his postscript he mentions the printer Dunlap: "Not being able to procure a paper with the Test, I suppose you will find it wth such of the printers as take Dunlaps papers. I have sent one to Mr. Gerry of M[arble]head."

The JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: MAGNIFICENT AMERICAN HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS: FIRST SELECTION

|
New York