59
59
Gage, Thomas, Commander of British Forces in North America
Estimate
2,0003,000
LOT SOLD. 3,438 USD
JUMP TO LOT
59
Gage, Thomas, Commander of British Forces in North America
Estimate
2,0003,000
LOT SOLD. 3,438 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: MAGNIFICENT AMERICAN HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS: FIRST SELECTION

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New York

Gage, Thomas, Commander of British Forces in North America
Autograph letter signed ("Tho. Gage"), 1 page on a bifolium (8 1/2 x 7 1/4 in.; 215 x 184 mm), New York City, 25 December 1764, to Col. John Bradstreet (at Albany, New York); formerly folded, pinprick hole touching one letter. Green half-morocco drop-box, gilt-stamped brown morocco title label on spine.
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Catalogue Note

The recall of his predecessor Amherst resulting from Pontiac's Rebellion, led Thomas Gage (1720–1787) to pay close attention to Indian affairs, though he spent most of his time enjoying the comforts of New York City. His correspondent Colonel John Bradstreet (1714–1774) led a force of 1400 men to reinforce Fort Detroit and was, in the latter part of 1764, negotiating with Pontiac and arguing with his superior officer over the terms of those negotiations.

The present letter, emblematic of their fractious relationship, concerns a dispute about pay for men in the New York Regiment, who had joined in an irregular manner: "I have received your's of the 17th Inst. inclosing Mr. Schuyler's Certificate of a Conversation he had with the Deputy-Pay Master of the New York Regiment, concerning the Pay due to Men of that Regt. inlisted by you, and to whom the said Pay-Master refused Payment. I have again laid this Matter before the Lieut.-Governor [Cadwallader Colden], who has sent for Mr. Ten-brock's Principals to know the reason of this refusal, who had returned for Answer; that the Men in question had never joined the Regt. of course never served in it, or were ever under the Command of any officer of the Regt. and that it was directly contrary to their Instructions to give Payment for any Men in that Situation."

A letter from Bradstreet to Gage (29 November 1764, now at Worcester, American Antiquarian Society) first raises the dispute remarking that the men were mustered by Gage's orders. The dispute continued into February of the next year with Bradstreet enlisting the aid of Lord Shelburne.

The JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: MAGNIFICENT AMERICAN HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS: FIRST SELECTION

|
New York