42
42
Continental Congress
Estimate
25,00035,000
JUMP TO LOT
42
Continental Congress
Estimate
25,00035,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: MAGNIFICENT AMERICAN HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS: FIRST SELECTION

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New York

Continental Congress

A True Copy of the Petition from the General Congress in America to His Majesty Which was delivered to Lord Dartmouth the 1st of September, 1775, and to which His Lordship said no answer would be given. Arthur Lee, Richard Penn. London: for John Hardy, by order of A. Sheffield, [1782]

Broadside, folio (18 1/2 x 11 3/8 in.; 470 x 289 mm). Printed vinework border, two small fold tears and three small marginal tears, some light marginal spotting. Light-blue half-morocco drop-box, gilt-stamped title on spine.


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Literature

Not in Adams, The American Controversy; OCLC reports 1 copy in the New York Public Library.

Catalogue Note

The Olive Branch Petition, here printed in a rare broadside together with the King's speech accepting the independence of the American colonies.

First printed in Philadelphia, 1775 and reprinted several times that year in that city and in London in pamphlet form, the present issue appears to be the only one in broadside format. It is signed in type by John Hancock followed by the names of all the signers. The combination of the petition with the remarks given by George III on 5 December 1782 ("In thus admitting their separation from the Crown of these Kingdoms, I have sacrificed every consideration of my own to the wishes and opinion of my people."), seems a gesture of reconciliation, as the original petition, written by Dickinson, expressed loyalty to the monarch and represented the loyalist party in the Continental Congress.

The petition describes the "mild and just government" previously prevailing whereby Great Britain and the colonies were "the wonder and envy of other nations." All this was endangered by the statutes and regulations imposed on the colonies by his Majesty's ministers. Presented to Lord Dartmouth on 21 August, the reply was given that "as his Majesty did not receive it on the throne, no answer would be given." The King interpreted it privately as a species of dissimulation with which "by vague Expressions of Attachment to the Parent State...they were preparing for a General Revolt."

The JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: MAGNIFICENT AMERICAN HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS: FIRST SELECTION

|
New York