181
181
Wayne, Anthony, Continental General
Estimate
3,0005,000
LOT SOLD. 10,625 USD
JUMP TO LOT
181
Wayne, Anthony, Continental General
Estimate
3,0005,000
LOT SOLD. 10,625 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: MAGNIFICENT AMERICAN HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS: FIRST SELECTION

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New York

Wayne, Anthony, Continental General
Autograph letter signed ("AntyWayne"), 3 pages (8 1/2 x 6 in.; 216 x 152 mm), Headquarters, Ebenezer, [Georgia], 19 February 1782, to Governor John Martin; browned, long center fold split with remnants of old tape repairs.
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Catalogue Note

Filling the ranks. "I am so fully convinced that nothing but a perminant force can secure the Independence of America," confides Wayne to Georgia Governor John Martin. "[E]xert every power for the immediate completion of your Quota of Continental troops, offering a bounty similar to that given by South Carolina—but not to introduce a competition otherwise those people would inlist as soldiers will be induced to join that State who offers the most liberal bounty, & which from experience has been found very determental to the Service."  Even though the war had technically ended with the British surrender at Yorktown in October 1781, Wayne was sent to Georgia to flush the British out  of there. When he arrived in Georgia in January 1782, the British outnumbered his forces by about two to one. The Continental Army of 1781-82 was confronted with its greatest crisis: Congress was bankrupt, making it difficult to replenish the soldiers whose three-year terms had expired. 

Recruiting African-Americans. "I would also beg leave to suggest, the expediency of adopting the same kind of plan with Carolina for embodying a Corps of Negroes, in proportion to your Circumstances & Local situation—Indeed this measure will become a matter of Necessity if the report is true, of the enemy forming black Corps in Charlestown, & Savannah." The British actively recruited slaves belonging to Patriot masters and, consequently, more blacks fought for the Crown. However, African-American slaves were promised freedom in exchange for military service in New England, and made up one fifth of the Northern Continental Army. In spite of being outnumbered Wayne conducted several successful campaigns against the British, causing them to evacuate Savannah in July 1782.

The JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: MAGNIFICENT AMERICAN HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS: FIRST SELECTION

|
New York