161
161
Tyler, John, tenth President
Estimate
7,00010,000
LOT SOLD. 4,375 USD
JUMP TO LOT
161
Tyler, John, tenth President
Estimate
7,00010,000
LOT SOLD. 4,375 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: MAGNIFICENT AMERICAN HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS: FIRST SELECTION

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New York

Tyler, John, tenth President
Autograph letter signed ("John Tyler"), 4 pages (9  3/4  x 7  3/4  in.; 248 x 197 mm), Saratoga, NY, 12 August 1850, to Charles A. Wickliffe of Kentucky; scattered staining and spotting, horizontal and vertical creases.  Half red and black morocco clamshell case, spine gilt-lettered. 
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Provenance

Mrs. Philip D. Sang, sold Sotheby's New York, 23 April 1986, lot 167

Catalogue Note

Tyler on the Compromise of 1850.

The former President writes to Charles Wickliffe, once his Postmaster General, concerning intrusions on his lands in Union County, Ky., by the Kentucky coal Company and asks Wickliffe's "friendly offices" in dealing with the state legislature in this regard, commenting, "... I make no apology for addressing you this request because I judge of you by myself and I know that if in my power I should be ready to render you a similar service ...."  Tyler goes on to remark on the Congressional debates over what would become known as the Compromise of 1850—the legislation that attempted to deal with the most troublesome current aspects of the slavery question, including the status of slavery in the territories acquired through the Mexican War: "One word on passing political events.  The agitations of the country have given me great uneasiness.  I fear great & permanent alienation of feeling between the sections—Could we possibly have committed the blunder of leaving the slave question open in negociating the Treaty of Guadoloupe Hidalgo?  It has always seemed to me to be a great omission and one that could easily have been supplied—an intimation to Mexico was alone sufficient to have induced her to stipulate for perfect freedom of election on the part of her surrendered provinces upon that and all other points of domestic policy—As it is I hope that the future is destined to be overcast with clouds ...."

 

The JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: MAGNIFICENT AMERICAN HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS: FIRST SELECTION

|
New York