149
149
(Quakers)
Estimate
5,0007,000
LOT SOLD. 3,125 USD
JUMP TO LOT
149
(Quakers)
Estimate
5,0007,000
LOT SOLD. 3,125 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: MAGNIFICENT AMERICAN HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS: FIRST SELECTION

|
New York

(Quakers)
The Testimony of the People called Quakers given forth by a Meeting of the Representatives of said People, in Pennsylvania and New-Jersey, held at Philadelphia the twenty-forth Day of the first Month, 1775.  Broadside (13  1/2  x 8  3/8  in.; 343 x 212 mm, three edges uncut), [Philadelphia, 1775]; four horizontal folds, one with 1/2 in. tear.  Quarter black morocco clamshell case, grey morocco lettering pieces on spine.
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Literature

Evans 14052 (locating only one copy)

Catalogue Note

An anti-revolutionary broadside from the Quakers of Philadelphia.  In this statement the Society of Friends affirm their position as peaceful subjects of the king and urge their fellow countrymen to refrain from publishing inflammatory writings and addresses.  "From our past experience of the clemency of the king and his royal ancestors, we have grounds to hope and believe, that decent and respectful addresses from those who are vested with legal authority, representing the prevailing dissatisfactions and the cause of them, would avail towards obtaining relief, ascertaining and establishing the just rights of the people and restoring the public tranquility ...."

John Pemberton (1727–1795), whose name appears as clerk and signatory of the document, was known for his opposition to the war against the Delawares in 1756.  Twenty years later he followed the same pacifist principles with regard to the American Rebellion.  He was arrested and imprisoned in September 1777, one of several Philadelphia Friends taken into custody after publication of broadsides such as this.  General Washington pardoned him in April 1778.

Very rare.

The JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: MAGNIFICENT AMERICAN HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS: FIRST SELECTION

|
New York