142
142
Pierce, Franklin, as United States Senator
Estimate
2,0003,000
LOT SOLD. 2,188 USD
JUMP TO LOT
142
Pierce, Franklin, as United States Senator
Estimate
2,0003,000
LOT SOLD. 2,188 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: MAGNIFICENT AMERICAN HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS: FIRST SELECTION

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New York

Pierce, Franklin, as United States Senator
Autograph letter signed, as U.S. Senator from New Hampshire, 3 pages (9  3/4  x 7  7/8  in.; 248 x 200 mm), Washington, 21 January 1841, to H. H. Carroll, docketed, postmarked integral address leaf addressed and free-franked  by Pierce; vertical and horizontal folds, small seal tear in center fo third page, affecting two words.  Half green morocco gilt clamshell case.
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Catalogue Note

In this letter written to H. H. Carroll, editor of the Concord, New Hampshire, Patriot, Senator Pierce laments the fact that his correspondent, who had once served as a clerk in Pierce's law office, had been unable to put the political newspaper, the Patriot, on a paying basis.  Pierce recommends that he should move on to other things if there is not an upturn in subscriptions, but hopes that Carroll will stay on until after the March elections and keeps his plans to himself until after they are held.  Pierce then turns to political matters: "I am very glad to hear you speak so cheerfully of our prospects in March.  The letters which I have received from different parts of the State speak in the same tone.  Merrimack Co. must keep up to her glorious majority of 2270 and I trust our friends in Concord will not allow any personal animosities and jealousies to give to the Federalists a triumph which with harmonious concert on our part I do not believe they can achieve.

"The debate in the Senate upon the land bill and questions growing out of it still continues.  Crittenden made a log cabin–coon skin speech today as destitute of argument as it was replete with wit & sarcasm.  Wright replied to him in his most powerful and over powering manner.  Webster followed in favor of distribution & the levying of duties to defray the expenses of Government and made a sort of begging speech to have the coming Administration judged with clemency & candor.  It struck me that the replies of Wright and Benton were perfectly conclusive upon two grounds.  And yet such is the embarassed, I might almost say the bankrupt condition of many of the States, that I do not believe that any argument or any presentation of danger in the distance, however clear, can prevent a distribution by the next Congress — A National Bank — A bankrupt law containing the voluntary principle alone and excluding corporations — A distribution of the public domain — A high tariff et cet, et cet.  Is not the prospect one to make every patriot weep and tremble for his Country? ...."

The JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: MAGNIFICENT AMERICAN HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS: FIRST SELECTION

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New York