133
133
Monroe, James, fifth President
Estimate
8,00012,000
LOT SOLD. 5,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
133
Monroe, James, fifth President
Estimate
8,00012,000
LOT SOLD. 5,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: MAGNIFICENT AMERICAN HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS: FIRST SELECTION

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Monroe, James, fifth President

Autograph letter signed ("James Monroe"), 3 pages (9 7/8 x 7 3/4 in.; 250 x 197 mm), Oakhill, 3 October 1827 to General Thomas Jesup; integral leaf torn through Monroe's signature but neatly repaired.


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Catalogue Note

Coping with criticism of his conduct in the War of 1812. Monroe reaches out to General Thomas S. Jesup to produce a document to help dispel ongoing criticism of his conduct in the War of 1812. Describing his current situation, he  writes: "It has been my lot, which I have felt severely, to experience attacks, and often from quarters which I did not expect, on almost every position of my public life & service, and among them, on my conduct in the department of war, when called into it, by the President, on great emergency, in the late war. One of these attacks, consists, in a charge that I did not take necessary measures for the defense of N. Orleans in 1814. 15., when menac'd with invasion by ordering out, & purveying to the scene of action the force necessary for its defense, and by providing, in aid of the deposit there, an adequate supply of arms, and munitions of war of every kind." Monroe notes he is pleased to hear General Jesup has "an accurate knowledge of the number of arms, and of munitions of war of every kind, cannon, muskets, &c &c, and of the state in which they were at the time on invasion & of the cause as you understood, why they were not known to the general & taken into service; and that you were willing to communicate to me a document to that effect, in justification of my conduct, should I be bound in justice to my character to use it." He futher explains: "I have no desire to enter into any discussion with Genl. Jackson or his friends in the present question, I mean the approaching election, respecting my conduct in taking the measures necessary for the defense of the City in the late war; nor shall I unless compelled to do it for it is my earnest wish to take no part in the election in favor of either side to the prejudice of the other. When I left office, I had good wishes for both parties, having given to both proofs of confidence & esteem which I wish to preserve. The possession of such a document however, from you, may be very useful hereafter, and in any event, it will be very gratifying to me to have it."

The JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: MAGNIFICENT AMERICAN HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS: FIRST SELECTION

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New York