131
131
Middleton, Arthur & Thomas Heyward, Signers of the Declaration of Independence from South Carolina
Estimate
8,00012,000
LOT SOLD. 46,875 USD
JUMP TO LOT
131
Middleton, Arthur & Thomas Heyward, Signers of the Declaration of Independence from South Carolina
Estimate
8,00012,000
LOT SOLD. 46,875 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: MAGNIFICENT AMERICAN HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS: FIRST SELECTION

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New York

Middleton, Arthur & Thomas Heyward, Signers of the Declaration of Independence from South Carolina
Printed document on vellum with manuscript accomplishment signed ("Arthur Middleton" "Tho. Heyward"), 1 page (5 7/8 x 10 in.; 150 x 254 mm), [Charleston, South Carolina], 18 June 1775, left-side border of printer's ornaments, also signed by Charles Pinckney, Henry Laurens, and 6 other members of the Council of Safety, docketed on verso "Lieut. Hughes"; formerly folded, a few small stains. Light blue half-morocco drop-box, gilt-stamped title on spine.
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Literature

See E. McCrady, History of South Carolina in the Revolution (1901), p. 15

Catalogue Note

In January 1775, the South Carolina colonial assembly was disbanded by Royal Governor William Campbell, and reformed illegally as the Provincial Congress. In this and subsequent meetings in June and March of 1776,  the South Carolinians created a temporary government to rule until the colony had settled things with Britain.  Henry Laurens and John Rutledge were voted "president" of the state which called itself the "general assembly of South Carolina." The first Provincial Congress appointed a Council of Safety to administer the affairs of the Province. At the same time it provided for the formation of three regiments of regular troops.

This document  promotes Henry Hughes to 2nd Lieutenant in the first Regiment of Foot  "In pursuance of the resolutions of the provincial congress." This style is intentional for at this point the congress was uncertain about revolution and neither passed taxes to support these troops, nor wished to issue a sealed certificate which seemed too much to promote independence (see McCrady).

The JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: MAGNIFICENT AMERICAN HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS: FIRST SELECTION

|
New York