125
125
Marion, Francis, as Continental General
Estimate
12,00018,000
LOT SOLD. 20,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
125
Marion, Francis, as Continental General
Estimate
12,00018,000
LOT SOLD. 20,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: MAGNIFICENT AMERICAN HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS: FIRST SELECTION

|
New York

Marion, Francis, as Continental General

Autograph letter signed ("Fran. Marion"), 1 page (12 5/8 x 7 7/8 in.; 320 x 200 mm), Georgetown [South Carolina], 29 May 1781, to General Nathanael Greene, addressed and franked on verso in Marion's hand, docketed "from Genl. Marion May 29th 1781, on public service"; formerly folded, silked, small mended tear in left margin, two small tears in right margin, all without loss, right margin shaved affecting two letters.


Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Literature

Continental Congress Papers, Letters from Nathanael Greene, vol. 1, p. 180, item 155 (from a transcript); Papers of General Nathanael Greene, vol. 8

Catalogue Note

The Swamp Fox reports to General Greene on the British withdrawal from Georgetown: "It cannot be conceived the Joy this event has given our friends."

Georgetown was the least important of three coastal posts held by the British (the others being Savannah and Charleston). The bulk of Greene's forces were directed inland at Camden and partisan forces under Thomas Sumter and under Marion, working with General Charles Lee, had taken Orangeburg, and Forts Motte and Granby. Camden was abandoned by the British general Rawdon on 10 May, Georgetown was evacuated on the 23rd.

Marion writes: "In my last I acquainted you of my intention of marching to this place. Yesterday I arrived and immediately began to open intrenchment, but the Enemy thought proper to slip on board of their vessels at 9 o'cl[ock] at night & fell down towards the Bar. They had a galley, two gunboats and an armed schooner. I immediately too possession of the redoubt & town. In the first was three 9 pounders & a cannonier three trunnions knocked off & spiked, their baggage all carryd off."

"I shall only stay to swell the works when I will immediately cross Santee River and take post near Monks Corner and wait your orders. The enemy leaving this post has saved a great deal of provisions ... & prevent the Torys from destroying our friends & leave them at leisure to pursue their planting."

The JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: MAGNIFICENT AMERICAN HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS: FIRST SELECTION

|
New York