513
513
Clemens, Samuel L.
Estimate
4,0006,000
LOT SOLD. 4,063 USD
JUMP TO LOT
513
Clemens, Samuel L.
Estimate
4,0006,000
LOT SOLD. 4,063 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

THE JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: ARTS & SCIENCES, INCLUDING THE MARK TWAIN COLLECTION

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New York

Clemens, Samuel L.

A group of two letters addressed to Mrs. Richard Gilder and two ink sketches one named for Mrs. Gilder and the other for her daughter Dorothea:

Autograph letter signed ("S. L. Clemens"), one page bifolium (8 x 5 1/4 in.; 205 x 132 mm), [New York], 17 February 1894, apologizing for not answering an invitation to visit as he had been working the entire night before on a letter to his wife and had dropped off to sleep at Mrs. Gilder's receiving hour. — Autograph letter initialed ("SLC"), one page on mourning stationery (6 7/8 x 4 1/2 in.; 174 x 115 mm), Dublin, New Hampshire, 28 July 1905, reporting that Clara is still depressed about her mother's death, thanks Mrs. Gilder for calling on Clara, and that he has done 70 days' worth of work in 59. — Humorous ink drawing on Clemens's Fifth Avenue stationery (5 3/8 x 4 in.; 140 x 100 mm), titled "Doe-Luncheon" at the top, 11 February 1908, depicting a woman with a rain hat and umbrella, captioned "Lady out in the rain" and designated for Mrs. Gilder, initialed ("SLC"); a few spots. — Humourous ink drawing on Clemens's Fifth Avenue stationery (5 3/8 x 4 in.; 140 x 100 mm), titled "Doe Luncheon" at the top, 11 February 1908, depicting a man falling overboard from a sailboat, captioned "Ship sinking — man overboard" and designated for Dorothea Gilder, initialed ("SLC"); stain along bottom margin touching initials.  


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Catalogue Note

Helena de Kaye Gilder was an artist and wife of author, poet, and editor of Century Magazine, Richard Watson Gilder. The letter from Dublin is brimming with concern for Clemens's daughter Clara and her emotional well-being after her mother's death. "I can see by Clara's letter that she was standing in deep need of mothering, & that in the nick of time you fulfilled that gracious & beautiful office & tided her over the hard place ... She 'had been really ill with depression for some time, & was reaching a point of desperation' when you called her." Katy Leary recalled that at her mother's funeral, Clara was lying under the casket "in a little heap, sobbing." Two weeks after the funeral, Clara entered a New York City sanitarium where she recuperated from nervous prostration for nearly a year. Her father was forbidden to see her. Once recovered, Clara began a pattern of quarrelling with her father and fleeing the household. In spite of his disapproval of her music career, Clemens financed all of Clara's expenses, including her music lessons. This letter is very telling of his affection and concern for his middle daughter.  

THE JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: ARTS & SCIENCES, INCLUDING THE MARK TWAIN COLLECTION

|
New York