478
478
Clemens, Samuel L.
Estimate
2,5003,500
LOT SOLD. 1,250 USD
JUMP TO LOT
478
Clemens, Samuel L.
Estimate
2,5003,500
LOT SOLD. 1,250 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

THE JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: ARTS & SCIENCES, INCLUDING THE MARK TWAIN COLLECTION

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New York

Clemens, Samuel L.

2 pages of autograph manuscript from The Gilded Age (8 x 4 7/8 on.; 203 x 127 mm), [Hartford, 1873], approximately 185 words, written in black ink, with a few corrections and emendations, numbered at top margins 145 and 276 (originally numbered 169 and 328); first leaf inlaid.


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Catalogue Note

Two fragments from Clemens's portion of the 1873 political satire, The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today, which he wrote in collaboration with his Hartford, Connecticut, neighbor Charles Dudley Warner. The first page comes from chapter 6 and concerns Judge Hawkin's considering the sale of the family's Tennessee lands for $3,000." 'You'd sell it, Si?' said Mrs. H. excitedly. 'Try me!' Mrs. Hawkins was out of the room in a moment. Within a minute she was back again with a business-looking stranger, whom she seated, & then she took her leave again. Hawkins said to himself, 'How can a man ever lose faith? When the blackest hour comes, Providence always comes with it — ah, this is the very timeliest help that ever poor harried devil had; ..."

The second page appears four chapters later, at the point that Laura confronts Mrs. Hawkins with the news that she has learned she was adopted: "She said she knew all—she knew that Laura had discovered the secret that Mr. Hawkins, the elder children, Col. Sellers, & herself had kept so long and so faithfully; & she cried & said that now that troubles had begun they would never end; her daughter's love would wean itself away from her & her heart would break. Her grief so wrought upon Laura that the girl almost forgot her own troubles for the moment in her compassion for her mother's distress. Finally Mrs. Hawkins said: "Speak to me, child — do not forsake me. Forget all this miserable ..."

Apart from some minor changes in incidentals (including the expansion of ampersands to "and"), the manuscript is identical to the printed text.

THE JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: ARTS & SCIENCES, INCLUDING THE MARK TWAIN COLLECTION

|
New York