456
456
Clemens, Samuel L.
Estimate
3,0005,000
LOT SOLD. 7,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
456
Clemens, Samuel L.
Estimate
3,0005,000
LOT SOLD. 7,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

THE JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: ARTS & SCIENCES, INCLUDING THE MARK TWAIN COLLECTION

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New York

Clemens, Samuel L.

Two autograph letters dating to Clemens's early career in the 1860s.

Autograph letter signed ("Sam L. Clemens Or 'Mark Twain' if you have forgotten genuine name"), 2 pages on one leaf of ruled notepaper, Wailuku, 26 April [1866] to Messrs Kimball, expressing eagerness to visit Haleakala volcano in the company of Messrs Kimball, but needs time to arrive as his horse is pokey; wear at horizontal folds; provenance: Nick Karanovich (sale, Sotheby's 19 June 2003, lot 13); Victor and Irene Murr Jacobs (sale, Sotheby's, 29 October 1996, lot 180) — Autograph letter signed ("Mark Twain"), one page, Hartford, 7 October [1868], to Edward Burlingame, indicating that he was getting out a book and asking whether Burlingame remembered his old Honolulu pun about Twain's name; rust stain on top margin from paper clip.


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Catalogue Note

Eager to promote California's literary talent, a state newspaper sent Clemens to Hawaii in 1866 as a roving reporter. While on his tour he writes to his new friends whom he met aboard the Ajax en route from San Francisco: "Don't you think for a moment of going up on Haleakala without giving me an opportunity of accompanying you! ... give me a day or two ... to get there in, with my horse ... His strong suit is grace & personal comeliness, rather than velocity ..." Clemens also met the diplomat Anson Burlingame and his son Edward in Hawaii. He writes to "Ned" that he is getting a book out—Clemens delivered the manuscript of Innocents Abroad to Bliss in October 1868. He also asks Ned if he recalls his Honolulu joke which was a pun on Matthew 5:41: "If a man compel thee to go with him a mile, go with him, Twain." Clemens was at first delighted with this joke, and for a time used it in his lectures, but its constant repetition in the newspapers ultimately made him loathe it.

THE JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: ARTS & SCIENCES, INCLUDING THE MARK TWAIN COLLECTION

|
New York