445
445
Whitman, Walt
Estimate
10,00015,000
LOT SOLD. 11,875 USD
JUMP TO LOT
445
Whitman, Walt
Estimate
10,00015,000
LOT SOLD. 11,875 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

THE JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: ARTS & SCIENCES, INCLUDING THE MARK TWAIN COLLECTION

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New York

Whitman, Walt
Autograph postscript signed ("Walt"), 2 pages (2 3/4 x 5 in.; 69 x 127 mm) on a slip of paper cut from a larger sheet, [Washington,] "2 o'clock p m Friday 6th" [May 1864], to his mother, Louisa Van Velsor Whitman; tiny red accession number on verso. Matted in a maroon morocco portfolio with a large photographic portrait of Whitman (9 1/4 x 7 in.; 235 x 178 mm), on a gray mount with the embossed imprint "Copyright 1887 by George C. Cox," signed at the foot of the mount by Whitman, the dtae of the portrait noted on the verso, "April 15 1887, New York"; photograph slightly abraded, mount dampstained.
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Provenance

Estelle Doheny (Christie's, 18 October 1988, lots 1653 (the postscript, described as a complete autograph letter signed with no reference to the balance of the text) and 1664 (photograph)

Literature

The Correspondence of Walt Whitman, ed. Allen & Bradley, 1:122

Catalogue Note

Whitman sends his mother the latest military news on the eve of the Battle of the Wilderness—and draws a revealing portrait of Ulysses S. Grant. The present postscript was at some point separated from the letter to which it was originally appended; the letter proper is in the Library of Congress, part of the Charles Feinberg Collection. Whitman here reports that just as he was mailing the letter home to Brooklyn, "there is an extra out here that Grant has advanced his army or a portion of it to the region of the Chancellorsville battle of just a year ago & has either flanked Lee, as they call it (got in on his army between him & Richmond)—or else that Lee has hurried back or is hurrying back to Richmond—whether there is any thing in this story or not, I can't tell—the city is full of rumors & this may be one of them—the government is not in receipt of any information to-day—Grant has taken the reins entirely in his own hands—he is really dictator at present ... Grant is very secretive indeed—he bothers himself very little about sending news even to the President or Stanton—only time can develope his plans—I still think he is going to take Richmond & soon. (but I may be mistaken as I have been in past)—Well dearest Mother, keep up good courage, good bye for present."

THE JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: ARTS & SCIENCES, INCLUDING THE MARK TWAIN COLLECTION

|
New York