367
367
Lindbergh, Charles
Estimate
2,5003,500
LOT SOLD. 1,250 USD
JUMP TO LOT
367
Lindbergh, Charles
Estimate
2,5003,500
LOT SOLD. 1,250 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

THE JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: ARTS & SCIENCES, INCLUDING THE MARK TWAIN COLLECTION

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New York

Lindbergh, Charles
Typed letter signed ("Charles A. Lindbergh"), 1 page (7 x 6 1/4 in.; 178 x 160 mm), no place [possibly East Amwell, New Jersey], 18 February 1929, to Hon. Clyde Kelly in Washington D.C.; formerly folded, lightly browned.
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Catalogue Note

Lindbergh's connection with Air Mail goes back, before his solo flight to Paris, to 1925 when he was hired by the Robertson Aircraft Corporation in Saint Louis to provide Air Mail service between that city and Chicago. He continued this work until February 1927 when he began to work on the design of his plane Spirit of Saint Louis. After making his historic flight to Paris, he used the fame that his exploits had brought him to help promote the use of the Air Mail service by giving speeches and by carrying souvenir mail on special promotional flights. His correspondent, Clyde Kelly (1883–1935), representative from Pennsylvania, introduced a resolution to permit private contracting of airmail service. This resolution, the Airmail Act of 1925 was signed into law on February 2, 1925, prompting many companies to venture into the aviation field (e.g., Boeing, Douglas, and Pratt & Whitney).

In the letter, written two weeks before the abduction of his son, Lindbergh argues for extending Air Mail service to the countries of Central America: "Due to the slowness of the present means of travel and the expense and difficulties of railroad construction, it appears that the airplane affords the most feasible way of bringing modern transportation to isolated communities. The Central American Republics ... displayed an intense interest in the possibility of rapid communication with the United States and with each other and were anxious to know when the facilities of the air lines would be placed at their disposal for mail and for passengers."

THE JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: ARTS & SCIENCES, INCLUDING THE MARK TWAIN COLLECTION

|
New York