348
348
Hearst, William Randolph
Estimate
20,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 40,625 USD
JUMP TO LOT
348
Hearst, William Randolph
Estimate
20,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 40,625 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

THE JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: ARTS & SCIENCES, INCLUDING THE MARK TWAIN COLLECTION

|
New York

Hearst, William Randolph

Group of 15 autograph letters (some unsigned, others signed "WHR", "G." and "George"), 2 autograph notes (one signed "W. R."), one 4-line poem on a scrap torn from an auction catalogue, 63 pages (most 11 x 8 1/2 in.; 279 x 216 mm, but several of larger format) some on Palace Hotel (San Francisco) and La Cuesta Encantada stationary, some on brown butcher's paper, others on plain writing paper, San Francisco and San Simeon, Calif., London, and n.p., ca. 1918-1929; condition generally good, with folds and creases.  4 autograph envelopes and one typed envelope; creased and torn. 


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Catalogue Note

"What's the use of my being madly in love with an ice cream freezer?...I suppose ...I will dream about you ...and I will probably think I am sitting on the top of Mont Blanc with my arms around a snow drift."  William Randolph Hearst's love letters to Marion Davies.

In this revealing cache of letters written primarily in the early 1920's, the married newpaper tycoon reveals not only his love for the young actress, but his insecurities over her fidelity to him and his jealousy and desire to keep close tabs on her.  Hearst makes some attempts to conceal his affair from prying eyes: he almost never addresses Davies by name in the salutations of these letters, he signs some of the letters "G." or "George", and he addresses some of the evelopes to Davies using her real name, M. Douras.  On the other hand, some of the letters to his "dearest sweetheart" and "darling girl" are written on his San Simeon stationary.  One letter addressed to "Marion" and signed "WRH", in an envelope addressed to "Marion Davies, Tempermental Star", was obviously delivered by a messanger and not posted.  These letters obviously passed through the hands of legendary Hollywood gossip columnist Hedda Hopper at some point.  Also present in this lot are 19 envelopes (11 of which bear the return address of "Hedda Hopper's Hollywood") with typed and handwritten descripting of the letters contents.  It was Hopper who broke the story in 1950 that Hearst's will appointed Davies to run the Hearst Corporation.

In addition to romantic issues, Hearts also touches on Davies's career time and again in these letters: "I saw the stills you sent me.  They are fine but you look too thin, sweetheart.  Please don't make yourself sick fasting, dearest.  There are almost hollows in your cheeks in one picture .... I am going to come on and feed you up—get a better cook on the yacht .... I don't wanty you to be an angel yet—at least not any more than you are."

A constant complaint in the letters is Hearst's lonliness when away from Davies: "I just think I'll run down to Los Angeles and get me a sweetie who isn't so cold and matter of fact and full of business.  Dog gone it , I had been looking forward to this telephone talk for a week and all you said was 'How are your corns' .... I suppose you would feel better if I didn't call you at all.  Probably I broke up a date or something."  Hearst also sends Davies a six-stanza poem titled "The Cynic's Love Song": "I love a girl named Marion, she holds me in her thrall/Of her blue eyes and golden hair and figure lithe and tall/She loves me too, she tells me so/Alas that isn't all/She likewise loves Flo Charlie Henry Nealie Joe and Paul."

A letter addressed to "Chere Marie" reads in part, "You're running around with all your old beaux and a lot of new ones.  I know all about you .... I've got to get a sweetie that will miss me when I'm away and love me when I'm home .... [S]uch is life—full of disappointments .... Just now I'm going to bed.  I've been out to Tails—looking [the girls] over.  I didn't see any as pretty as you but I guess they are more domestic—You fickle flighty false and flirtatious little gad about.  I hope I don't dream about you.  Let me think of some affectionate and faithful little flapper who is innocent enough to appreciate the attentions of her devoted sweetie .... If you read of a swain disappointed in love commiting suicide it's ME."

A fine collection of letters documenting the early years one of the best-known love affairs in 20th-century America.

 

THE JAMES S. COPLEY LIBRARY: ARTS & SCIENCES, INCLUDING THE MARK TWAIN COLLECTION

|
New York