37
37
Do-Ho Suh
METAL JACKET
Estimate
300,000400,000
LOT SOLD. 362,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
37
Do-Ho Suh
METAL JACKET
Estimate
300,000400,000
LOT SOLD. 362,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Selected Works from the Neuberger Berman and Lehman Brothers Corporate Art Collections

|
New York

Do-Ho Suh
B.1962
METAL JACKET
three thousand stainless steel dog tags affixed on a U.S. military jacket fabric liner
Overall: 63 by 55 by 15 in. 160 by 139.7 by 38 cm.
Executed in 1992- 2001, this work is number 3 from an edition of 6.
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Provenance

Lehmann Maupin Gallery, New York
Acquired by the present owner from the above in April 2002

Exhibited

St. Louis, Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, On the Margins: Displacement, Individuality, and Transcendence, February 2008 - April 2008 (another example exhibited)
New York, Museum of Arts & Design, Second Lives: Remixing the Ordinary, September 2008 - April 2009 (another example exhibited)

Catalogue Note

The present work, Metal Jacket, is a densely precise grouping of three thousand dog tags ordained into the shape of a hollowed sterling military jacket. At a first glance the dog tags pointedly recall the physical image of the soldiers that could have worn them while serving their country. Upon close inspection, however, the dog tags are embossed with nothing more than random and meaningless words, rather than the identifying agents for individuals in service. This paradox deftly anesthetizes the ability for any personal association or emotion, and challenges one to associate what was intended as a deeply individualistic, to a universal and communal experience. Metal Jacket engages the viewer in a confrontation with his own gaze peeking out from the mirroring facets, which in turn become the collective other encasing the jacket's argently framed void. As the artist himself asserted, "Often, people, even critics, think that my work is about individuality, disappearing into anonymity. But it's not. I don't think anonymity exists actually. It's just a convenient way to describe a certain situation. It's our problem not to see certain individuals, or not to see difference or individuality. I just want to recognize them." (Do Ho Suh, quoted in Susan Sollins, Art: 21 Art in the Twenty-First Century, vol. 2, New York, 2003).

Selected Works from the Neuberger Berman and Lehman Brothers Corporate Art Collections

|
New York