622
622
A soviet porcelain part tea service: 'To the Soviet Metro', Verbilki factory,

1935

Estimate
6,0008,000
LOT SOLD. 15,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
622
A soviet porcelain part tea service: 'To the Soviet Metro', Verbilki factory,

1935

Estimate
6,0008,000
LOT SOLD. 15,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Russian Works of Art, Fabergé and Icons

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London

A soviet porcelain part tea service: 'To the Soviet Metro', Verbilki factory,

1935

comprising: tea pot, covered sugar bowl, cream jug, nine cups and ten saucers, after a design by Alexandra Chekulina, all painted with scenes depicting the construction of the Moscow metro, with factory marks
Quantity: 22
Height of tea pot: 12cm, 4 3/4 in.
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Catalogue Note

This unusual tea service was created to celebrate the inauguration of the Moscow Metro which, of all the grandiose and monumental plans produced for Soviet architecture in the twenties and thirties, was one of the few to be completed.  It is one of the most successful and important examples of Soviet state sponsorship in the early Stalin period.
Everyone who has seen and travelled on the Moscow Metro agrees that it is a marvel. Of course the builders of the Moscow Metro started late and could profit from the examples of other countries.  Russian engineers visited the metro systems of Berlin, London and Paris before beginning their work.  They particularly admired the escalators at Piccadilly Circus station and this is, probably, why the Russians decided to have escalators rather than lifts in the Moscow system.
The central Moscow stations are much richer in adornment than their Berlin, London and Paris counterparts. They are decorated with sculpture, mosaics, stained glass, glazed ceramics and painted tiles. Walls are faced with the many varieties of stone found in Russia, including two dozen different colours of marble.  The floors are usually of durable granite.  On busy days up to seven and a half million people use the Moscow Metro.
We are grateful to Nina Lobanov-Rostovsky for providing this note.

Similar pieces are held in the collections of the State Museum of Decorative and Applied Arts, Moscow, and the State Museum of Ceramics, Kuskovo.  For comparison, please see Elvira Sametskaya, Soviet Agitation Porcelain, Collector's Book - IP Media, 2004, pl. 3[1].

Russian Works of Art, Fabergé and Icons

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London