327
327

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION

Vladimir Davidovich Baranov-Rossiné
RUSSIAN
FEMME NUE DEBOUT
Estimate
120,000180,000
LOT SOLD. 92,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
327

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION

Vladimir Davidovich Baranov-Rossiné
RUSSIAN
FEMME NUE DEBOUT
Estimate
120,000180,000
LOT SOLD. 92,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Russian Art

|
New York

Vladimir Davidovich Baranov-Rossiné
1888-1944
RUSSIAN
FEMME NUE DEBOUT
stamped with artist's initials BWR (lower right); stamped with artist's initials BWR (on the reverse); labeled with number 200 and Linda Hyman Fine Arts (on the frame)
oil on canvas
28 1/2 by 19 in.
72.5 by 48.5 cm
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We would like to thank Dimitri Baranoff-Rossiné for providing additional catalogue information.

Provenance

Sale: Christie's London, April 1, 1977, lot 22, illustrated
Arezzo Fine Arts, Inc
Sale: Christie's New York, May 15, 1980, lot 16, illustrated
Armand Castellani, Buffalo
Linda Hyman Fine Arts, New York
Acquired directly from the above by the present owner circa 1991

Exhibited

Niagara, New York, Castellani Art Museum of Niagra University, 1980-1990 (on loan)

Catalogue Note

Born in Ukraine, Baranov-Rossiné initially trained in Odessa before spending four years at the State Petersburg Academy. His studies led to his participation in two major avant-garde exhibitions, Zveno (The Link) in Kiev and Venok (The Wreath) in St. Petersburg. In 1910 he emigrated to Paris, drawn to the city's innovative artistic community and supportive environment. Cubism was beginning to replace Fauvism as the most influential style of the period, and artists such as Braque, Léger and Picasso were gaining the respect of their peers. Baranoff-Rossiné was heavily influenced by the Cubists' abstracted planes as well as Robert and Sonia Delaunay's simultanéisme color theories. His canvases depict dynamic color transformations in layered geometric shapes and planes, forming a kaleidoscope of color and rhythm that evoke a sense of kinetic frenzy. Many of his canvases from the early 1900s centered on feminine, Venus de Milo-esque figures; this series later culminated in his stunning portrayals of the creation and apocalypse, in which his women take on the role of Eve.  

Russian Art

|
New York