175
175
Celebration of the Passover by the Jews (Haggadah of the London Times), London: 17 August 1840
Estimate
2,5003,500
LOT SOLD. 6,563 USD
JUMP TO LOT
175
Celebration of the Passover by the Jews (Haggadah of the London Times), London: 17 August 1840
Estimate
2,5003,500
LOT SOLD. 6,563 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Judaica

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New York

Celebration of the Passover by the Jews (Haggadah of the London Times), London: 17 August 1840
8 pages (23 1/2 x 17 1/2 in.; 600 x 445 mm). As issued folio. Bifold strengthened. Library stamp [Athenaeum] on pp. 1, 3. Tax stamp in red ink, p.5.
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Literature

Yosef Hayim Yerushalmi, Haggadah and History, pl. 95, pp. 77–79; S. and V.D. Lipman eds., The Century of Moses Montefiore (1985), pp. 131–48

Catalogue Note

"One of the most notorious outbreaks of the Blood Libel in modern times erupted in Damascus, Syria, in February 1840. With the connivance of the Pasha and the French Consul, a group of Jews were thrown into prison and accused of having murdered a Franciscan friar for ritual purposes. The news spread rapidly throughout the world, and while diplomatic and rescue efforts were being launched, the "Damascus Affair" was everywhere discussed and argued. As might be expected, the Times of London gave the developing story extensive coverage, the newspaper printed letters upholding or condemning the charge, and devoted several editorials of its own to the topic.

On August 17th, 1840, the Times went further. On page 3 of the issue of that day, it printed a complete English translation of the Passover Haggadah. It was an attempt to submit further evidence of the absurdity of the charge that Jews require Christian blood for the Passover ritual. Coincidentally, the Times also editorialized favorably on prospects for the restoration of the Jews to Palestine. Of the Jews who had been imprisoned and tortured, one died and another accepted conversion to Islam in order to avoid further suffering. The rest were freed at the end of August, largely as a result of Sir Moses Montefiore's journey to the Near East in order to intercede personally in their behalf" (Yerushalmi).

Provenance: Atheneaeum- stamp on pp. 1,3.

Important Judaica

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New York