161
161
Seder Tefilah mi-Reshit ha-Shanah ve'Ad Aharit ha-Shanah (Order of Prayer from the Beginning of the Year to the End of the Year), Wilhermsdorf: Tzvi Hirsch ben Haim, 1718
Estimate
20,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 80,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
161
Seder Tefilah mi-Reshit ha-Shanah ve'Ad Aharit ha-Shanah (Order of Prayer from the Beginning of the Year to the End of the Year), Wilhermsdorf: Tzvi Hirsch ben Haim, 1718
Estimate
20,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 80,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Judaica

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New York

Seder Tefilah mi-Reshit ha-Shanah ve'Ad Aharit ha-Shanah (Order of Prayer from the Beginning of the Year to the End of the Year), Wilhermsdorf: Tzvi Hirsch ben Haim, 1718

130 leave (8 x 6 1/4 in.; 205 x 160 mm). foliation: [4], 1-124, 2= 130 leaves. Printed on parchment. Title within typographic border; title and final leaf stained; minor soiling. Brown morocco, deeply tooled and gilt; spine defective; worn.


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Literature

Freimann, Die Hebraischen Pergamentdrucke, 134; Rosenfeld, Wilhermsdorf 79; Vinograd, Wilhermsdorf 104 (calling only for 128 ff.)

Catalogue Note

an exceedingly rare interlinear Hebrew-Yiddish prayer book printed on vellum

As long as there have been Hebrew books, some discerning collectors have demanded the creation of luxury copies that surpass the standard editions of whatever work is being produced. For their part, printers endeavored to create typographically superior copies to satisfy the demands of these connoisseurs of the Hebrew book.

For many Jews in Central and Eastern Europe in the early 18th century, their comprehension of Yiddish, the common vernacular of everyday life, far outweighed their understanding of the "Holy Tongue," Hebrew. This Siddur with its innovative interlinear translation was designed to allow the worshipper to focus more intently on the words of the liturgy. Rather than having to turn to the facing page and locate the translation of the Hebrew prayers, someone using this prayer book could, in a single glance, scan both the Hebrew original and the Yiddish translation, line by line.

Although the title page proclaims that its purpose is to allow "every person to understand what they are praying," it is quite likely that this edition was intended for the women of the community as well, whose training in Hebrew was frequently less comprehensive than that of their male counterparts. This idea is only reinforced by the presence in this edition of the exceedingly rare final two leaves, lacking in many copies, but present here. Entitled Teitsch Tekhines, these leaves are printed entirely in Yiddish and contain the supplications, which though they may have been authored by men or women, were nearly universally intended for a female audience.

Excluding the present lot, only four copies are known on vellum. Freimann records the first three copies, all in public collections: Amsterdam (Bibliotheca Rosenthaliana), Oxford (Bodleian) and Munich (Staatsbibliothek). Another copy was sold in these rooms on 3 June 1982, lot 256. This is possibly the only remaining copy of this deluxe prayerbook, printed on vellum.

 

Important Judaica

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New York