122
122
Hassagot shel ha-Ramban (Glosses to Sefer ha-Mitzvot), Nahmanides, Constantinople: David and Samuel ibn Nahmias, 1510
Estimate
10,00015,000
LOT SOLD. 12,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
122
Hassagot shel ha-Ramban (Glosses to Sefer ha-Mitzvot), Nahmanides, Constantinople: David and Samuel ibn Nahmias, 1510
Estimate
10,00015,000
LOT SOLD. 12,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Judaica

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New York

Hassagot shel ha-Ramban (Glosses to Sefer ha-Mitzvot), Nahmanides, Constantinople: David and Samuel ibn Nahmias, 1510

70 leaves (7 3/8 x 5¼ in.; 187 x 134 mm). Apparently lacking only first and final blanks. Several leaves mended in lower gutter margin affecting a few words supplied in manuscript, occasional light marginal dampstains and spots. Eighteenth century flexible boards, ms. title on spine.


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Literature

Vinograd, Const. 23; Yaari, Const. 8; Mehlman, 764

Catalogue Note

Hassagot  is the name given to that genre of rabbinic works wholly devoted to the criticism, usually negative, of earlier books. These works appeared as early as the time of Saadiah Gaon, when rabbinical "books" in the modern sense were first written, but reached their peak in the twelfth century, especially in Provence.  Nahmanides composed his hassagot with the sole purpose of defending his predecessors, Alfasi and the author of the Halakhot Gedolot, against the criticisms which had been leveled against them by Maimonides in the latter's Sefer ha-Mitzvot

Nahmanides, strongly criticized Maimonides, accusing him of inconsistencies. Perhaps the most celebrated difference between the two was whether or not the settlement of the Land of Israel should be reckoned as one of the 613 commandments. In Nahmanides view, the obligation to settle the Land is "a positive commandment for all generations, binding upon every individual even in the time of exile."

David Abraham Gentilomo, whose name is written on the front paper cover of the book may have been one of a group of 11 Jews from Lippiano who sought permission to settle in Perugia in 1735.

Literature: Ariel Toaff, The Jews of Umbria, p. 1403.

Provenance: Abraham ben Isaac of Livorno- his signature above title; David Abraham Gentilomo-his name on front cover; M.O. Goldschmidt-stamped exlibris on title page; Meir ben Shalom Judah Goldschmidt- his bookplate.

Important Judaica

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New York