47
47
A pair of late George III mahogany library bergères
cira 1810, possibly by Gillows
JUMP TO LOT
47
A pair of late George III mahogany library bergères
cira 1810, possibly by Gillows
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Furniture, Silver and Ceramics

|
London

A pair of late George III mahogany library bergères
cira 1810, possibly by Gillows
with caned backs, sides and seats, together with buttoned damask back and seat cushions
94cm. high, 67cm. wide, 60cm. deep; 3ft. 1in., 2ft. 1¼in., 1ft. 11¾in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Catalogue Note

The design for the present pair of armchairs is inspired by Thomas Hope, the influential Regency collector and promoter of the gout grec.  Hope published Household Furniture and Interior Decoration, 1807 subsequent to his eight year grand tour, including visits to Greece, Italy and Asia Minor.  The art of the Antique that he studied in these countries provided him with a major source for his published designs.  A second source which Hope acknowledged was the work of the leading French Empire designers, Percier and Fontaine, whose  Recueil de Décorations Intérieures, 1800, likewise owes a debt to the the art of classical civilisation.  Household furniture included many designs for Klismos shaped seat furniture and furniture supports in the form of monopodia related to those on the offered lot.   Hope's direct influence can be seen in the designs of the architect and furniture designer George Smith who frequently incorporated animal mask supports in his repertorie of ornament.

The use of mahogany, combined with sparse decoration and reeded mouldings on the present armchairs is analagous with the output of the prolific Lancaster cabinet-makers whose Estimate Sketch Books drawings are preserved in the Gillow archives at Westminster Library, London.  Furthermore the ball motif to the base of the arms has been identified as a motif employed on Gillows library bergères (see Susan Stuart, Gillows of London and Lancaster, 1730-1840, 2008, 2 vols., vol. 1, p. 230, pl. 223).

 

Important Furniture, Silver and Ceramics

|
London