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A pair of George III parcel-gilt, tulipwood, amaranth, mahogany and marquetry pedestals
circa 1775, attributed to Mayhew and Ince
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39
A pair of George III parcel-gilt, tulipwood, amaranth, mahogany and marquetry pedestals
circa 1775, attributed to Mayhew and Ince
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Furniture, Silver and Ceramics

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London

A pair of George III parcel-gilt, tulipwood, amaranth, mahogany and marquetry pedestals
circa 1775, attributed to Mayhew and Ince

Provenance

Possibly acquired by Isabella Shepheard, Marchioness of Hertford (d.1834) for Temple Newsam House, Leeds.

Thence by descent at Temple Newsam House and subsequently, Hoar Cross Hall, Staffordshire until sold, Property of the Trustees of the Late Nicholas Meynell, Esq., Christie's London, 15 April 1999, lot 34.

Literature

Gareth Evans, Hoar Cross Hall, 1994, pp. 46 and 161, illustrated in situ in the Dining Room circa 1900 and 1950.

Catalogue Note

The present pedestals feature marquetry which closely relates to that produced by the leading 18th century London cabinet-makers,  Ince and Mayhew. In particular, the distinctive satyr mask on the front panel is very similar to those found on a group of furniture associated with this firm (see Lucy Wood, Catalogue of Commodes, 1994, no. 27, pp. 226-235). This includes a wine cooler at Stourhead, Wiltshire (see Ralph Edwards, Dictionary of English Furniture, 1954, Vol. III, fig. 10, p. 374); a commode sold from the collection of Lord Leverhulme at the Anderson Galleries in New York, 9th-13th February 1926, lot 290 (subsequently sold, Sotheby's London, English Furniture, 1st May 1987, lot 89);  a commode sold Christie's London, 50 Years of Collecting, 14 May 2003, lot 20 and a tulipwood and marquetry oval centre table, with provenance from Brocket Hall, Hertfordshire, sold Christie's London, The Estate of His Royal Highness the Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester, KG., KT., KP., 26-27 January 2006, lot 251.

The form of these pedestals also relates to a marquetry `Term for Bust's, etc.' illustrated in A. Hepplewhite & Co. The Cabinet-Maker and Upholsterer's Guide, 1788, pl. 120 and a another drawing for a maquetry pedestal by John Linnell, preserved in the collection of The Victoria and Albert Museum (see Helena Hayward `The Drawings of John Linnell in the Victoria and Albert Museum', Furniture History, 1969, fig. 71).

Important Furniture, Silver and Ceramics

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London