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33
A fine and Important Meissen part dessert service made for a Franconian Noble family
circa 1767-69
Estimate
180,000250,000
JUMP TO LOT
33
A fine and Important Meissen part dessert service made for a Franconian Noble family
circa 1767-69
Estimate
180,000250,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Furniture, Silver and Ceramics

|
London

A fine and Important Meissen part dessert service made for a Franconian Noble family
circa 1767-69

each piece painted in underglaze-blue, iron-red and gilding, with a scroll-painting unrfurling from the top and depicting a bird perched on a flowering peony branch, all set against a background of stylized, scrolling leaves in underglaze-blue and gilt flowers picked out in iron-red, the silver-gilt cutlery with matching porcelain handles, comprising;
fifty-four dessert plates ( 22cm.),
one bowl (23.5cm.),
thirty Augsburg silver-gilt mounted knives,
thirty Augsburg silver-gilt mounted forks,
thirty Augsburg silver-gilt mounted spoons,
together with two similarly decorated Chinese Imari dishes ( 27.3 and 35cm.)


 



 


Quantity: 147

crossed swords marks in underglaze-blue, some pieces with a dot in underglaze-blue and blue painters mark 't' for either Johan Gottlieb Thomas or Johann Michael Trauzel, impressed numerals,
the cutlery with maker's mark for Abraham Warmberger and date letters 1767-69.


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Provenance

This remarkable dessert service was commissioned in the mid 1760s by a Franconian nobleman to complement his Chinese dinner service dating from the early 18th Century. It remained in the family castle from the time of its delivery until it was acquired  by the present owner direct from the family.
 

Catalogue Note

Meissen decoration of this type, based on a Chinese Imari original, is traditionally associated with factory production between 1730-40.The Royal Collection in the Porzellansammlung in Dresden owns several Chinese plates with this scroll pattern but only one matching Meissen plate from c. 1730. This could suggest that the Dresden Court had an entire Chinese dinner service and that Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony and Poland, had intended to have this Chinese service copied by his porcelain factory in Meissen. The Museum für Kunsthandwerk in Cologne retains one misfired Meissen example. See Barbara Beaucamp-Markowsky, Porzellan, A Catalogue of the Kunstgewerbemuseum, Cologne, 1980, p.141, no 78 for a plate with a trial pattern in blue and white, also with the mark of the painter `t' found on those in the present service.

Important Furniture, Silver and Ceramics

|
London