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A group of eleven Italian scagliola trompe l'oeil panels within frames by Petrus Seyter (active in Rome c. 1687) and Amedeo Seyter (Active 1712-1734, Turin and Rome)
first half 18th century
Estimate
30,00050,000
LOT SOLD. 37,250 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
12
A group of eleven Italian scagliola trompe l'oeil panels within frames by Petrus Seyter (active in Rome c. 1687) and Amedeo Seyter (Active 1712-1734, Turin and Rome)
first half 18th century
Estimate
30,00050,000
LOT SOLD. 37,250 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

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A group of eleven Italian scagliola trompe l'oeil panels within frames by Petrus Seyter (active in Rome c. 1687) and Amedeo Seyter (Active 1712-1734, Turin and Rome)
first half 18th century
panel only (1) 42cm. x 34cm., (2) 38cm. x 29cm., (3) 35.5cm. x 26cm., (4) 36cm x 30cm., (5) 36cm. x 30cm., (6) 36cm. x 25cm., (7) 36cm. x 27cm., (8) 42.5cm x 47.5cm., (9) 47cm. x 41cm., (10) 45cm. x 37cm., (11) 45cm. x 37cm.
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Catalogue Note

Comparative Literature:
Anna Maria Massinelli, Scagliola l'arte della pietra di luna, Rome, 1997, pp. 159, 101-101a, for a pair of panels, one representing il Foro di Nerva, the other a fluvial scene, p.184, no.120-120a. Also see pp.184, no.120-120a and 185-188.

Pietro and Amedeo Seyter:
The Seyter family had German origins and the first artist in the family was Daniele Seyter, born in Vienna in 1649 who died in Turin in 1705, and was known as Daniele Fiammingo (the Flemish). He had three relatives working in the scagliola medium: Pietro, Amedeo and Tarsilla Vittoria Seyter who were all active in Rome in the 18th century.

Their scagliola work is characterised by the simulation of engravings. As with scagliola panels which were made in Carpi, the Seyter brothers used only two colours, usually red with cross-hatching on a white background. Their work also simulated paper and marble by the effective use of trompe l'oeil.

Pietro (1687 Rome -?) first half 18th century:

He was Daniele's second son and as a military architect, he designed and built the fortifications of Turin. He lived in Rome and started working on drawings of fortifications under the the orders of Cardinal Gualtieri. Subsequently, he  worked for Pope Clemente XI. He made a set of fantastical views of coastal cities in pale colours, with strong silhouettes and shadows. 

Amedeo, active between 1712 and 1734 in Turin and Rome:
Amedeo was the nephew of Pietro and he worked in a similar style to that of Pietro, except that he preferred views of landscapes with rivers and also "capricci" with Roman ruins. He also sometimes incorporated amber pieces in his scagliola work.

The scagliola technique has been used since Roman times initially to imitate marble and later pietre dure. It is composed of pulverised selenite from the Appennini Mountains in Emilia and Tuscany called lapis specularis or pietre di luna which is then ground down and mixed with lime. This mixture is then placed on to a stone support and inlaid with a composition of coloured scagliola and graphite. 

Related panels by the same makers sold at auction include:
-A pair signed P.S. Ing. f and dated 1744, was sold at Christie's, London, 29th November 1990, lot 266 (£18,700).
-A related pair was sold in these Rooms, lot 16, 13th June 1997.
-Three similar panels by Amadeo Seyter were sold in these Rooms, 12th December 2001, lots 113 and 114.

See catalogue note at sothebys.com

 

Important Furniture, Silver and Ceramics

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London