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50
A Louis XV ormolu-mounted kingwood, tulipwood and marquetry table en chiffonnière
circa 1750, stamped Delorme
Estimate
15,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 68,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
50
A Louis XV ormolu-mounted kingwood, tulipwood and marquetry table en chiffonnière
circa 1750, stamped Delorme
Estimate
15,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 68,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important French Furniture, Ceramics and Carpets including Property from the Estate of Mrs. Robert Lehman

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New York

A Louis XV ormolu-mounted kingwood, tulipwood and marquetry table en chiffonnière
circa 1750, stamped Delorme
Adrien Delorme, maître in 1748
height 27 1/4 in.; width 11 1/2 in.; depth 9 1/2 in.
69.5 cm; 29.5 cm; 24.5 cm
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Catalogue Note

A table with identical marquetry inlay and ormolu corner mounts was sold The Alexander Collection, Christie's New York, 30 April, 1999, lot 69. Interestingly, that table bore the stamp of the ébéniste Péridiez and not that of Adrien Delorme. A number of other tables of this form with comparable marquetry and ormolu mounts are known today; some stamped by Delorme, some by Péridiez and some by yet another maker: Adrien-Antoine Gosselin. Tables stamped by Delorme include one from the collection of Elinor Dorrance Ingersoll, sold Christie's New York, 11 November 1977, lot 151, and another -fitted with ormolu carrying-handles- now in the Louvre and originally given by Louis XV's wife, Maria Leszcynska to the gouvernante des Enfants de France, Madam Campan, see Guillaume Janneau, Le Mobilier Français: Le Meuble L'Ebénisterie, Paris, 1989, fig. 95. Tables by Péridiez include the abovementioned piece from the Alexander Collection and one with a pierced ormolu gallery in the Huntington Collection. A table of this model, but with different marquetry, stamped by Gosselin is now in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, see F.J.B. Watson, The Wrightsman Collection, Vol. 1, New York, 1966, pp. 272-273, while another was sold Christie's New York, 4 November 1992, lot 93. It is likely that Delorme was stamping these pieces in his capacity of a marchand and not as an ébéniste.

Important French Furniture, Ceramics and Carpets including Property from the Estate of Mrs. Robert Lehman

|
New York