195
195
A George II Silver Snuffers Tray from the Anson Service, Paul de Lamerie, London,

1739

Estimate
40,00060,000
LOT SOLD. 50,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
195
A George II Silver Snuffers Tray from the Anson Service, Paul de Lamerie, London,

1739

Estimate
40,00060,000
LOT SOLD. 50,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important English & Continental Silver & Objects of Vertu

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New York

A George II Silver Snuffers Tray from the Anson Service, Paul de Lamerie, London,

1739

of hourglass form, on four husk-decorated scroll feet, the body cast and chased at each end with recessed shell fluting filled with overlapping flowers and scalework, the rim decorated with shells, beading and terminating in two scrolled leaves, the raised handle cast with a leaf and shells, center engraved with a crest and baron's coronet


marked on base
length 8 1/2 in.
21.6cm
13oz 9dwt
420g
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

The arms are those of Anson quartering Carrier for Admiral George Anson (1697-1762), son of William Anson of Shugborough, and his wife, Isabella Carrier. 

Admiral George Anson, thence by descent to the Earl of Lichfield
Christie's, 8 June 1893, lot 4
Christie's, 14 December 1920, lot 100

 

Literature

Antiques Magazine, June 1994.

Catalogue Note

Admiral George Anson joined the Navy in 1712 at the age of fourteen, and was promoted through the ranks until 1761 when he was appointed admiral of the fleet.  From 1740-44 he circumnavigated the globe and is best know for capturing a Spanish galleon containing treasure and bullion amounting to £500,000.  He returned to England with a hero's welcome and the contents of the ship were "paraded in triaumph through the City [of London] in a procession of thirty-two wagons, the ship's company marching with colors flying and band playing" (The Dictionary of National Biography, 1975 ed., s.v. "Anson").

In 1747, Anson received substaintial prize money for his feat and was promoted to the peerage as Baron Anson of Soberton.  In the same year, he was also responsible for the capture of the French ship, L'Invincible, which was worth £300,000.  Anson married secondly in 1748 Lady Elizabeth Yorke, daughter of lord chancellor, Philip, Earl of Hardwicke.  From 1751, with a short intermission in 1756, he served as First Lord of the Admiralty until his death in 1762.

Amongst the fifty-six items commissioned by Anson from Paul de Lamerie and sold at Christie's in June, 1893 were a dinner service, candelabra, soup tureen, inkstand, cruet frames, salvers and sauceboats and a fine snuffers tray.  A fine fish slice by Lamerie with the Anson arms was sold from the Jamie Ortiz-Patiño collection, Sotheby's, New York, 22 April 1998, lot 30, and is now in the Jerome and Rita Gans Collection at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts ($167,500)

Important English & Continental Silver & Objects of Vertu

|
New York