170
170

PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF PHYLLIS MILLSTEIN – ALL PROCEEDS FROM THE IRVING AND PHYLLIS MILLSTEIN COLLECTION WILL FUND THE IRVING AND PHYLLIS MILLSTEIN CHARITABLE TRUST

Roy Lichtenstein
CLOUD AND SEA
Estimate
400,000600,000
LOT SOLD. 386,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
170

PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF PHYLLIS MILLSTEIN – ALL PROCEEDS FROM THE IRVING AND PHYLLIS MILLSTEIN COLLECTION WILL FUND THE IRVING AND PHYLLIS MILLSTEIN CHARITABLE TRUST

Roy Lichtenstein
CLOUD AND SEA
Estimate
400,000600,000
LOT SOLD. 386,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Roy Lichtenstein
1923 - 1997
CLOUD AND SEA
signed and dated 1964 on the reverse
porcelain enamel on steel
30 by 60 in. 76.2 by 152.4 cm.
Executed in 1964, this work is from an edition of 6.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Leo Castelli Gallery, New York (LC# 199)
Private Collection
Acquired by the present owner from the above

 

 

Exhibited

New York, Castelli Gallery, Landscapes, October - November 1964 (another example exhibited)
Spoleto Collicola, Festival Dei Due Mondi: Recent Landscapes by Nine Americans, June - July 1965 (another example exhibited)
Venice, Galeria L'Elefanta, Dine, Lichtenstein, Oldenburg, Rosenquist, Warhol, Wesselman, May - July 1966 (another example exhibited)
Amsterdam, Stedelijk Museum (and travelling), Roy Lichtenstein, November 1967 - May 1968 (another example exhibited)
London, The Tate Gallery, January - February 1968, no. 49, p. 40, illustrated




 

Literature

Maurizio Fagiolo, La ragion pura-pratica di Lichtenstein, 1965, pl. 3, illustrated
Bruno Alfieri, "The Arts Condition- Pop Means 'Not Popular'," Metro 9, April 1965, no. 9, illustrated in color
Alberto Boatto and Giordano Falzoni, eds., Lichtenstein, Rome, 1966, p. 59, illustrated
Edward Fry, "Roy Lichtenstein's Recent Landscapes," Art and Literature, Spring 1966, no. 8, illustrated
Ugo Mulas and Alan R. Solomon, New York: The New Art Scene, New York, 1967, p. 170-171
Exh. Cat., Amsterdam, Stedelijk Museum, Roy Lichtenstein,  November - December 1967, cat. no. 49, illustrated
Jean-Christophe Ammann and Wim Beeren, Roy Lichtenstein, Bern, 1968. n.p., no. 44, illustrated
The Tate Gallery, Roy Lichtenstein, London, 1968, p. 40, illustrated
Maria Netter, Comics und Abstraktion, Bern, 1968, p. 29, no. 1790, illustrated in color
Diane Waldman, Roy Lichtenstein, New York, 1971, p. 82, illustrated in color
Phyllis Tuchman,  "American Art in Germany:  The History of a Phenomenon," Artforum 9, November 1970, p. 29, no. 3, illustrated
Jean-Claude Meyer, "Les illusions optiques de Roy Lichtenstein," XXe siècle n.s., December 1973, no. 41, illustrated, p. 88.
Exh. Cat., Valencia, California Institute of the Arts, Drawings and Collages from the Artist's Collection, April - May 1977, p. 12, no. 9 illustrated
Museum Ludwig, and Siegfried Gohr, Paintings, Sculptures, Environments from Expressionism to the Present Day, Munich, 1986. no. 152, p. 192, illustrated in color
Janis Hendrickson and Roy Lichtenstein, Roy Lichtenstein, Cologne, 1994. p. 17, illustrated in color

Catalogue Note

Made famous for his comic strip-inspired paintings of romance and war subjects, Roy Lichtenstein derived his images from everyday common sources, and his paintings are now themselves cultural talismans of the 20th century. His borrowings from commercial printing techniques were prescient harbingers of the increasing influence of our media saturated times. On the most obvious level, Lichtenstein's pictorial vocabulary was predetermined by a reliance on source imagery, and his aesthetics were expressed by the vernacular style of mechanical reproduction. As he asserted in 1967, "I want my painting to look as if it has been programmed. I want to hide the record of my hand." (Roy Lichtenstein interviewed by John Coplans in Exh. Cat. Pasadena, Art Museum, Roy Lichtenstein, 1967, p. 12).

The present Cloud and Sea, arranged by Platonic proportion, proving that Lichtenstein was not only exceptionally proficient at composition, but that he was also profoundly insightful about the nature of perception. The composition is seductively pleasing to the eye, but on a deeper level, it is a testament to the power of the visual. By removing his chosen image – often a cliché – from its source, Lichtenstein ultimately turns the painting into a receptor of perception rather than a conveyer of information. Critics often ridiculed Lichtenstein as being merely an appropriator, or like the ironic title of his 1963 painting, an "Image Duplicator," who copied arbitrarily gleaned trite imagery. But in fact, any study of the artist's copious sourcebooks of clippings will reveal the extent to which he manipulated his chosen image with as keen an eye for composition and effect as any Old Master scene painter. It is, in fact, the subtle manipulation of the images that Lichtenstein's true genius lies. As Lichtenstein himself has noted, the difference is often not great but it is crucial: "It becomes a very exaggerated, a very compelling symbol that has almost nothing to do with the original." (Roy Lichtenstein by G. R. Swenson in Exh. Cat. London, Tate Gallery, Roy Lichtenstein, 1968, p. 12).

Contemporary Art Day Auction

|
New York