231
231
Yayoi Kusama
INFINITY-NETS (TOWWH)
Estimate
300,000400,000
LOT SOLD. 494,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
231
Yayoi Kusama
INFINITY-NETS (TOWWH)
Estimate
300,000400,000
LOT SOLD. 494,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Yayoi Kusama
B.1929
INFINITY-NETS (TOWWH)
signed, titled and dated 2007 on the reverse
acrylic on canvas
76 1/4 by 76 1/4 in. 193.7 by 193.7 cm.
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Provenance

OTA Fine Arts, Tokyo
Victoria Miro Gallery, London
Acquired by the present owner from the above

Catalogue Note

Arguably the most renowned post-war artist from Japan, Yayoi Kusama has been painting her countless versions of Infinity Nets since her arrival to New York in the fifties. Aiming to produce a fresh response to Abstract Expressionist painting, Kusama created these polka-dotted undulating patterns of all over abstractions inherently deriving from Jackson Pollock and Barnett Newman. Kusama's monochromatic Infinity Net paintings are unparalleled in their ability to transform the spaces they occupy. The repetitiveness of the dots and the curving, chain-like structures which surround them combine to form the undulating pattern known as the Infinity Net. The large canvasses of rhythmic patterns are able to overwhelm the senses and disorient one's sense of self in the spiraling, "whirlpool of consuming forms," (Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, "Dots Obsessions," Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery Press Release, January 25, 2005). She was able to create a work of art that was entirely innovative, "one that is more organic than other Minimalist Art, more abstract than Pop Art and more thoroughly immersed in a psychological dimension than Op Art," (Ibid).  

Kusama's Infinity Nets are immensely psychological as she created them from her hallucinations. She was unique in her ability to access her unconscious and communicate the sensations of her visions into fascinating webs of beauty and meaning. "Kusama's genius lies in her ability to work both from the inside out and from the outside in," (Exh, Cat., Los Angeles County Museum of Art [and travelling], Love Forever: Yayoi Kusama, 1958-1968, 1998, p. 81). The process of painting Infinity Nets is just as important as the work itself. Compulsively painting, often for days at a time, she poured herself physically and emotionally into her canvases. For instance, Kusama once, "described her psychological state during the process of painting as follows: 'it is like drinking a thousand cups of coffee, or eating a thousand meters of macaroni'" (Exh. Cat., Kunstverein Braunschweig, Yayoi Kusama, Köln, 2004, p. 6).                                                      

The present work, Infinity Nets (TOWWH), consumes the viewer with a disorienting sense of unlimited time and space while simultaneously pulsating with radiant beauty. Her repetitive techniques create shimmering webs of color that are more than just beautiful patterns; instead they are, "a repetitive production of a fantastic narrative that stars herself, as the object and subject, author and protagonist, artist and artwork (Exh, Cat., Los Angeles County Museum of Art [and travelling], Love Forever: Yayoi Kusama, 1958-1968, 1998, p. 70).    

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