Lot 51
  • 51

Frederic Remington 1861 - 1909

Estimate
125,000 - 175,000 USD
Sold
206,500 USD
bidding is closed

Description

  • Frederic Remington
  • Rattlesnake
  • inscribed Copyright by Frederic Remington with the Roman Bronze Works N.Y. foundry mark and numbered No. 18 beneath the base
  • bronze, dark brown patina

Provenance

James Graham & Sons, New York
Acquired by the late owner's father from the above, 1954

Literature

Bruce Wear, The Bronze World of Frederic Remington, Tulsa, Oklahoma, 1966, p. 78, illustration of another example p. 79
Harold McCracken, The Frederic Remington Book: A Pictorial History of the West, Garden City, New York, 1966, illustration of another example fig. 374
Peter Hassrick, Frederic Remington: Paintings, Drawings, and Sculpture in the Amon Carter Museum and the Sid W. Richardson Foundation Collections, New York, 1973, no. 88, p. 200, illustration of another example p. 201
Patricia Janis Broder, Bronzes of the American West, New York, 1974, illustration of another example p. 128
Michael Edward Shapiro, Cast and Recast: The Sculpture of Frederic Remington, Washington, D.C., 1981, p. 110, illustrations of other examples figs. 49-50
Michael Edward Shapiro and Peter Hassrick, Frederic Remington: The Masterworks, New York, 1988, pp. 67, 210, 211, illustration of another example p. 213
Michael D. Greenbaum, Icons of the West: Frederic Remington's Sculpture, Ogdensburg, New York, 1996, pp. 123-128, 197, illustrations of other examples pp. 124-128

Catalogue Note

Remington first modeled The Rattlesnake in 1904 exploring the technical problems of such a complex and active composition, combined with the additional challenge of twisting the horse beneath itself as it recoils from the snake. As Peter Hassrick has written: "The Rattlesnake (sometimes referred to as The Snake in the Path) is Remington's most graceful, sculptural rendition of the bucking horse in motion. The powerful thrust of the frightened horse and the desperate counterbalancing of the rider are expressed with a vigorous sweep and flow that make this bronze both eloquent and powerful. All movement and attention focus on a central point. All lines within the swirling configuration are directed toward one thing, the inconspicuous but deadly rattler in the foreground" (Frederic Remington: Paintings, Drawings, and Sculpture in the Amon Carter Museum and The Sid W. Richardson Foundation Collections, New York, 1973, p. 200).  

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