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A Victorian brass-bound mahogany campaign secretaire chest of drawers

second half 19th century

JUMP TO LOT
60
A Victorian brass-bound mahogany campaign secretaire chest of drawers

second half 19th century

JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

A Celebration of the English Country House

|
New York

A Victorian brass-bound mahogany campaign secretaire chest of drawers

second half 19th century

in two sections, the upper section fitted with a secretaire drawer opening to an arrangement of pigeons holes and small drawers over a long drawer and flanked by a bank of two short drawers all above a long drawer, the side panels each fitted with a brass bail handle, the lower section fitted with two graduated long drawers, the side panels each fitted with a brass bail handle, raised on turned bun feet.  The valances above the pigeon holes with old partial paper labels, the first inscribed Child & Co's Accounts, Trans- / fer Receipts. Letters. Child. / Indermaur. Executorship of / Aunt Story's Estate..., the next inscribred Bleaymire. Letters & papers on / Mrs. de Welpdale's Estate &... / cerning Mary's Le... / of Mar... / Pr..., the last inscribed Miscellaneous... / Letters..., one short drawer with a partial paper label inscribed ... / opy of Marriage settle.../ etc. / Children's hair / Sundries.  Locks stamped VR / J BRAMAH and VR / PATENT.
height 47 1/4 in.; width 44 in.; depth 19 1/2 in.
120.2 cm; 111.8 cm; 49.5 cm
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Provenance

Property from the Collection of Henry P. McIlhenny, Rittenhouse Square, Philadelphia
Sold Christie's, New York, May 21, 1987, lot 339

Catalogue Note

The paper labels with inked inscriptions refer to banking and legal subjects.  Child and Company is one of the oldest financial companies in the UK.  The partnership of Francis Child and Robert Blanchard, its roots in a goldsmith business, was started in 1664 and the firm was named 'jeweller in ordinary' to William III in the late 17th century.  The firm's name was changed to Child and Company after the death of Blanchard and remained in family hands until its sale in 1923 when sold by the 8th Earl of Jersey to Glyn, Mills & Co.  It is now a subsidiary of the Royal Bank  of Scotland Group.  Osterley Park, located on the outskirts of London, was bought in 1761 by Sir Francis Child who hired the architect Robert Adam to remodel the existing house.  It was given to the National Trust in 1949 and is open to the public.

A Celebration of the English Country House

|
New York