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130

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF MARY SCHILLER MYERS AND LOUIS S. MYERS

A Pair of George II mahogany and parcel-painted hall chairs
circa 1750
Estimate
6,0008,000
LOT SOLD. 5,313 USD
JUMP TO LOT
130

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF MARY SCHILLER MYERS AND LOUIS S. MYERS

A Pair of George II mahogany and parcel-painted hall chairs
circa 1750
Estimate
6,0008,000
LOT SOLD. 5,313 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

A Celebration of the English Country House

|
New York

A Pair of George II mahogany and parcel-painted hall chairs
circa 1750
each pierced backrest centered by a dished roundel painted with a crest of an escallop charged with a cross patonce between two wings elevated argent, the dished serpentine plank seat raised on cabriole legs joined by an X-form stretcher and ending in pad feet.  Each with a chalked number 4175 (?) to the underside of the seat.
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Provenance

Most probably Sir Samuel Fludyer, Bart., Lord Mayor of London, or his brother Sir Thomas Fludyer

Sold, Christie's, New York, January 29, 1994, lot 249

Catalogue Note

The present pair of hall chairs are painted with the crest of Fludyer, probably that of Sir Samuel Fludyer, Bart., or Sir Thomas Fludyer.

Sir Samuel Fludyer (b. 1704/05 d. 1768) and his brother Sir Thomas Fludyer were partners in a very successful cloth merchants firm.  The success of the firm and the power of its influence is evident in Samuel's becoming a director of the Bank of England in 1753, and then a deputy governor from 1766-68.  He or his brother was elected MP for Chippenham from 1754 until his death in 1768.  Samuel was knighted in 1755 and was created a baronet in 1759.  He was then elected Lord Mayor of London from 1761-62.  The newly crowned George III and Queen Charlotte were entertained by Sir Samuel at the Mansion house in 1761, after which time his brother Thomas was also knighted.  Whilst much of the furniture at the Mansion House had been supplied by Saunders in the early 1750s, mayors continued to furnish the house with their own furniture.  For example, Marshe Dickinson wrote in his diary of December 15, 1756 that he 'Began Housekeeping at Mansion House having sent in much of my own Furniture to Supply me with what was wanting there'.  Count Kielmansegge wrote on November 21, 1761 that he was unable to see inside the house 'as it is not yet in order, the new Lord Mayor being busy refurnishing it'.  It is therefore possible that Fludyer may have brought hall chairs bearing his coat of arms to the Mansion House.  See Sally Jeffery, The Mansion House, Chichester: Chichester Press, 1993, p. 195.

Besides the present pair of chairs, two services of Chinese export porcelain with 'famille rose' pattern surrounding the Fludyer arms were commissioned, probably by each of the brothers.  A portion of one service was sold at Sotheby's, London, May 16, 2007, lot 446.  See D.S. Howard, Chinese Armorial Porcelain, London: Faber & Faber, 1974, vol. I, p.486, P20.  The Fludyer family seat was Trostry, Monmouth, and is recorded at various residences at Great Cumberland Place, London.

A Celebration of the English Country House

|
New York