110
110

PROPERTY OF ANOTHER OWNER

A George III part-ebonized harewood, yew wood and satinwood marquetry Pembroke table attributed to Mayhew and Ince
circa 1780
Estimate
6,0008,000
LOT SOLD. 11,875 USD
JUMP TO LOT
110

PROPERTY OF ANOTHER OWNER

A George III part-ebonized harewood, yew wood and satinwood marquetry Pembroke table attributed to Mayhew and Ince
circa 1780
Estimate
6,0008,000
LOT SOLD. 11,875 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

A Celebration of the English Country House

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New York

A George III part-ebonized harewood, yew wood and satinwood marquetry Pembroke table attributed to Mayhew and Ince
circa 1780
the rectangular top centered by an oval satinwood patera within a beaded interlaced wreath surrounded by a geometric border flanked  hinged flaps each centered by an oval yew wood patera above an interlaced beaded swag within the same geometric borders, the frieze drawer centered by a yew wood oval patera above a beaded swag and opposed by a similar panel, raised on square tapering legs ending in brass capped casters.
height 28 1/2 in.; width closed 16 3/4 in.; width open 32 1/4 in.; depth 26 in.
72.4 cm; 42.5 cm; 81.9 cm; 66 cm
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Provenance

Sold, Sotheby's, London, August 1, 1980, lot 282

Catalogue Note

A very similar harewood and yewwood marquetry Pembroke table attributed to Mayhew and Ince with entwined pearl strings, yewwood oval panels and, as with the present table, a blue paper-lined drawer formerly fitted with a slide, was sold, Christie's, London, April 23, 2009, lot 186 (£12,500); an identical pair to this was sold, Christie's, New York, April 25, 2008, lot 68 ($51,000).  As discussed in Gilbert and Beard, The Dictionary of English Furniture Makers, 1986, the firm's use of yewwood was the 'only wholly idiosyncratic veneer wood the firm used and possibly unique to Mayhew and Ince among London cabinet-makers of this date', p. 593.  Additionally, 'moulded borders of commodes, tables and chests, especially when free of ormolu mounts, were often strengthened by ebonizing, a highly unusual device perhaps unique to the firm.'; op. cit.

A Celebration of the English Country House

|
New York