49
49
Cecil Collins, R.A.
THE FOOLS OF SUMMER
Estimate
8,00012,000
JUMP TO LOT
49
Cecil Collins, R.A.
THE FOOLS OF SUMMER
Estimate
8,00012,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

20th Century British Art

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London

Cecil Collins, R.A.
1908-1989
THE FOOLS OF SUMMER

signed


tapestry
161.5 by 219cm.; 63½ by 86¼in.

Commissioned in 1954, the present work was executed in 1958.


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Provenance

Commissioned by a Scottish-Italian Family, Edinburgh, for their house in Fiesole overlooking Florence, and thence by descent to the present owner

Exhibited

London, Whitechapel Art Gallery, Cecil Collins: A Retrospective Exhibition of Paintings, Drawings and Tapestries 1928-1959, November - December 1959, cat. no.227, illustrated in the catalogue pl.XVII;
Washington D.C., Smithsonian Institution, British Artist Craftsmen: An Exhibition of Contemporary Work, 1959-60, cat.no. 164.

Literature

The Scotsman, Tapestry Cutting Ceremony: For Exhibition in U.S. and Canada, 23rd October 1958, illustrated.

Catalogue Note

Although he produced very few designs for tapestry and textiles, it seems to have been a medium that lent itself to Collins' style and palette. His first essay in this area came in 1949 with the commission from Edinburgh Weavers of The Garden of Fools, and after the commission for the present work in 1954, he also produced two further designs for linen fabrics for the same company. He was also commissioned by the Ministry of Works in 1959 to produce a design for the main curtain of the conference hall in the new British Embassy in Washington, D.C. Illustrating characters from Shakespearean drama, the original studies for this design were sold in these rooms on 21st July 2005, lot 55.

The present work was woven by Ronald Cruickshank over a four month period in 1958 at the Golden Targe Studio, Edinburgh, and an image of the tapestry being cut away from the loom was published in the Scotsman (23rd October 1958). Loom cutting is a traditional Scottish ceremony which dates back to the seventeenth century.

20th Century British Art

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London