Lot 11
  • 11

James Tower

Estimate
6,000 - 8,000 GBP
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Description

  • James Tower
  • Leaf Form I
  • signed
  • glazed ceramic
  • height: 56cm.; 22in.
  • Executed in 1985, the present work is listed as Opus 192.

Provenance

London, Gimpel Fils, where acquired by the present owner, 18th August 1985

Condition

The ceramic is in generally good overall condition. Please telephone the department on 020 7293 6424 if you have any questions regarding the present work.
"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.
NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Catalogue Note

Born in Sheerness, Kent, Tower studied as an artist at the Royal Academy and the Slade, moving towards ceramics as a result of contact with William Newlands. He began teaching at Bath Academy of Art at Corsham Court in 1949 during a period when it was at the forefront of art education in Britain, and when his colleagues included many significant figures of the avant-garde, including William Scott, Peter Lanyon and Kenneth Armitage. Tower began exhibiting with Gimpel Fils, placing himself very clearly with the 'art' rather than 'craft' world, and indeed for long periods focussed his attention on sculpture. Considering himself an artist working in clay, and whose work offers notable parallels with the painters and sculptors of his generation, he has nevertheless been an influence on younger potters such as Elizabeth Fritsch and the distinctive flattened forms of his tin-glazed ceramics retain a feeling of modernity and spontaneity that belies their age.