3
3
Johannes Christiaan Karel Klinkenberg
DUTCH
A VIEW OF THE GRIMBURGWAL, AMSTERDAM
Estimate
80,000120,000
LOT SOLD. 132,750 EUR
JUMP TO LOT
3
Johannes Christiaan Karel Klinkenberg
DUTCH
A VIEW OF THE GRIMBURGWAL, AMSTERDAM
Estimate
80,000120,000
LOT SOLD. 132,750 EUR
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

19th Century Paintings & Contemporary Art

|
Amsterdam

Johannes Christiaan Karel Klinkenberg
1852 - 1924
DUTCH
A VIEW OF THE GRIMBURGWAL, AMSTERDAM

Provenance

Kunsthandel H. van der Kloet, The Hague
Kunsthandel Pieter A. Scheen, The Hague
Sale Amsterdam (Christie's), 11 November 1987, lot 114
Leslie Smith Gallery, Wassenaar, 1990's

Literature

W. Laanstra, Johannes Christiaan Karel Klinkenberg (1852-1924), De meester van het zonnige stadsgezicht, Laren 2000, cat. no. 0/100-2, p. 211, illustrated in colour

Catalogue Note

Klinkenberg received his artistic education at the Academy of Fine Arts in The Hague. For a few months he also took lessons from the marine painter Louis Meijer, who was known for his Romantic shipwreck scenes. Meijer however, passed away shortly thus subsequently Klinkenberg was apprenticed to Christoffel Bisschop, known for his historic and folkloristic genre pieces.
Initially Klinkenberg took over these kind of subjects from his master, but eventually his interest in this genre dwindled. In 1878 Klinkenberg exhibited Gezicht op de Vijverberg in Den Haag, in which he used the sparkly light that would later become his trademark. From that moment on he had established his name: Gezicht op de Vijverberg in Den Haag was acquired by the Museum Boymans in Rotterdam, later the Boymans van Beuningen.

Klinkenberg not only painted Dutch townscenes but he also went abroad to paint views of foreign cities like Bruges and Nuremberg. For a while Klinkenberg settled in Amsterdam at the Weesperzijde to focus on townscapes of Amsterdam. The present lot was painted in this period. He later returned to The Hague where he died on 23 April 1924.

In contrast to the loosely painted fantasy townscapes of his contemporaries like Jacob Maris and Jan Hendrik Weissenbruch, Klinkenberg applied himself to topographical accurate townviews, like Cornelis Springer. The atmosphere of Klinkenberg's townscapes however do not have the empathic anecdotal element Springer used to add to his Romantic townviews. The very particular rendering of sunlight in Klinkenberg's paintings gives them a sparkling and bright character. The effect is further enhanced by the large shadow effects, like in the present lot, which makes it an impressive example of Klinkenberg's use of chiaroscuro.

19th Century Paintings & Contemporary Art

|
Amsterdam