Lot 62
  • 62

Pyke Koch

Estimate
30,000 - 50,000 EUR
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Description

  • Pyke Koch
  • Rozen
  • signed v.P v.P.
  • oil on panel
  • 29 by 20 cm.
  • Painted circa 1949

Provenance

Collectie Drs Loek Brons B.V., Amsterdam
Acquired from the above by the present owner

Literature

Rotterdam, Museum Boymans-van Beuningen, Pyke Koch, Schilderijen en Tekeningen, February - May 1995, no.63, illustrated

Condition

This work is in mint condition.
"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.
NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Catalogue Note

Twenty years before Pyke Koch painted the cypress (please see lot 57), he painted these two roses. Koch liked using traditional symbols and put them in different settings so their values were remeasured. He painted roses as a symbol for friendship and this work is dedicated to his friend HenriĆ«tte Bienfait, whose nickname was Pietje. The initials in the corners thus stand for 'voor Pietje van Pyke' (for Pietje from Pyke).
The roses are painted in a very realistic fashion but nonetheless they seem unfamiliar. Maybe this is because of the mat palette in which they are painted. Also, their isolation from other flowers and their setting in a strange atmosphere with beams of light dramatically falling from the upper right corner gives the scene something surreal. Altogether it is clear this painting is not merely a representation of roses. However, the artist's true intentions remain a mystery to us.