Lot 126
  • 126

Kees Maks

Estimate
120,000 - 150,000 EUR
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Description

  • Kees Maks
  • Tuinscene - Garden Scene
  • signed
  • oil on canvas
  • 88 by 116 cm.
  • Painted circa 1910.

Condition

This work is in good condition. There are overall some minor hairline tension cracks mainly in the dark greenish painted background of the work. Examination under ultra-violet light reveals several small touches of professional retouching filled in the hairline cracks.
"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.
NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Catalogue Note

This garden scene, executed around 1910, was made when Kees Maks returned to Amsterdam after a long journey to Paris, Madrid and Rome. His stay in Paris especially influenced his development. The city became his second home where he would often return to. His art was greatly appreciated by the French: he exhibited at the important Salon des Ind├ępendants, the Salon d'Automne and in the galleries of the famous dealers Durand Ruel and Bernheim Jeune. The positive reaction to his work by the French critics was not followed by the Dutch art reviewers. The decadent world of the 'Beau Monde' was not as appreciated in Holland as it was in Paris. His subjects were seen as superficial and his style was difficult to place; somewhere between impressionism, expressionism and luminism. It was not until 1909, when exhibiting his first Garden scene at the artist's club Sint Lucas, that he was embraced by Dutch critics. One reviewer who had criticized him in the past now described him as ... 'een nieuwe vrucht aan den ouden vaderlandschen boom der kunst', meaning 'a new fruit on the old homeland tree of the arts'.

He made several variations on this theme which were elegantly titled 'Vrolijk Gezelschap' (Merry Company), 'Galante Praat' (Courteous  Conversation), Zomervreugde (Summer Bliss) and 'Au Grand Air'. The scene is situated in the small garden behind his studio on 'Prinseneiland' in Amsterdam. The paintings show fashionably dressed ladies and gentlemen around a table in a sunny garden. Maks' preoccupation with the effect of the sun through the leaves scattered on his subjects, the table and the surrounding garden shows the influence of French impressionism which he had seen in Paris. In 1910 he sent two garden scenes to the Salon d'Automne for which he received great reviews. In 1911 he exhibited again with a garden scene and again the critics were very appreciative. He became 'Soci├ętaire' of the Salon, indicating he could participate in this exhibition without the consent of the jury beforehand.

The painting offered for sale here is a strong example in the series of the garden scenes. It is slightly smaller in size than the others but not less impressive. It stands out because of the strong light-shadow segments. His style echoes Breitner's vivid and bold brush strokes and at the same time announces the simplified and sometimes almost abstract way of painting.