Lot 5
  • 5

WALTER PARTRIGE, LONDON

Estimate
20,000 - 30,000 USD
Sold
85,000 USD
bidding is closed

Description

  • A MASSIVE AND RARE SILVER TRIPLE CASE QUARTER REPEATING COACH WATCH WITH ALARM AND REPOUSSÉ SCENE BY A. ROMER
    1756
• two train gilt verge movement with chain and fusee, the balance bridge finely pierced and engraved with scrolls and grotesque mask, diamond endstone, the top plate elaborately engraved with scrolls, faceted pillars, signed gilt-metal dust cover, quarter repeating through the pendant on two large hammers on a bell, alarm striking on two large hammers, switch for alarm on and off at 5 o'clock • white enamel dial, Roman numerals, outer Arabic track calibrated for 60 minutes, blued steel beetle and poker hands, arch-form aperture for alarm indication, set by arbor at 6 o'clock • the inner case finely pierced and engraved with foliage and scrolls inhabited by a grotesque mask, stamped with case marker mark of script D.A, second case with fine chased repoussé work signed A. Romer F. centered by scene depicting the Adoration of the Magi with Mary and the baby Jesus as well as Joseph, other figures and animals in the background, surrounded by finely chased and engraved scrolls and foliage with pierced floral decorations to outermost edge, outer case covered in shagreen now lacking, with pierced holes for sound • signed on movement and dust cover Walter Partrige, London, with chased second case signed A. Romer F. and stamped D.A, both the inner and second cases hallmarked London 1756

Catalogue Note

The present watch is approximately 9cm. larger than the average size found in coach watches, placing this example among the largest known. For another known massive coach watch with a diameter of 18cm., see Masterpieces from the Time Museum, Sotheby's New York, December 2nd, 1999, lot 16, and for a third with a diameter of 16.6cm., see Sammlung Carl und Lini Nathan-Rupp, Die Kutschenuhren, cat. no.13, pp.74-83, Historische Museum Basel.

The chaser of this case remains rather mysterious as there is no mention in literature of an A. Romer working in London in this time period.

It is possible that this craftsman was a relation of Emick Romer who was a silversmith working in London around 1760-1770. He also could be a relation of John Romer, who is described in Edgcumbe, R., The Art of the Gold Chaser in Eighteenth Century London, as a silver chaser in 1753 and 1757 and later a silversmith in 1765.

The silversmith who made the inner and second cases, D.A, is also not found in literature.

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