Lot 9
  • 9

Richard & Timothy Good, Seaford, England

Estimate
20,000 - 30,000 USD
Sold
34,375 USD
bidding is closed

Description

  • A UNIQUE AND MASSIVE EIGHT DAY TRIPLE AXIS TOURBILLON MARINE CHRONOMETER WITH CONSTANT FORCE ESCAPEMENT
    COMPLETED IN 1981 NO 2 COMMISSIONED BY SETH G. ATWOOD

  • WIDTH OF BOX 26.5 CM
• the movement of full plate construction, with eight-day going train driven by a large keywound mainspring, contained in a going barrel, club tooth lever escapement with compensation balance, the tourbillon assembly mounted between the plates and visible through the glazed case, the tourbillon rotates on three planes, two of which take 60 seconds to complete one revolution and the third taking 40 seconds • 6½ inch silvered dial, black Roman numerals, subsidiary seconds at 6 o'clock, the dial signed Richard & Timothy Good, Seaford, England, Triple Tourbillon, No. 2, 1980 • contained within a two-piece brass bound, purpose-built mahogany box with specially made brass hardware, including flush handles glazed on the sides and bottom, mounted in gimbals, with provision for locking the bowl either dial up or vertically for display purposes, the top further inlaid with a brass plaque inscribed  'Made for Seth G. Atwood'

Provenance

Time Museum Inventory No. A533

Literature

Randall, A., The Time Museum Catalogue of Chronometers, cat. No. 70, pp. 179-181, figs. 109a-c and fig. 110.

Catalogue Note

One of the hallmarks of the Time Museum was Seth Atwood's vision to assemble a collection that would illustrate the history of time measurement in the most comprehensive manner to date. His quest did not stop with the horology of long-gone masters but would subsequently also include his patronage of living horologists, such as George Daniels, Anthony Randall and Richard Good.

The present lot by Richard Good is a further development on the double axis tourbillon created by the renowned horologist Anthony G. Randall (1938-). Randall developed his double axis or 'Tumble Tourbillon' per commission for Seth Atwood, which he later patented in July 1982. For more information, see lot 670, sold Masterpieces From the Time Museum, Part Four, Vol. II, October 13 & 14th, 2004.

The idea behind Good's triple-axis tourbillon, which Randall writes in his book, The Time Museum Catalogue of Chronometers, was to "take the idea of the double-axis tourbillon a stage further and proposed a tourbillon rotating about three axis at right angles. The intention was to make a mechanism that would entirely eliminate positional errors associated with a portable timekeeper. The first example to be made was built into a carriage clock... One of the chief technical problems of the triple-axis tourbillon is the greater degree of complication and especially the extra gearing required, as compared with a single or double-axis tourbillon. The amount of residual error of position to be corrected by the extra axis of rotation should not amount to more than seconds or fractions of seconds per day... The effects of gearing errors on the balance and spring are largely removed by the provision of a constant force escapement."

Interestingly, although Seth Atwood commissioned his Triple Axis tourbillon to be developed for a marine chronometer, Randall writes, "In this particular example, suspension of the timekeeper in gimbals entirely negates the advantage to be obtained from the tourbillon during normal running," thus would seem to be counter to the principals that Good would use in developing this piece.

For complete cataloguing of Good, No. 2, see op. cit, pp. 179-181, figs. 109a-c and 110.

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