Lot 94
  • 94

Ernst Koerner

Estimate
35,000 - 45,000 GBP
Log in to view results
bidding is closed

Description

  • Ernst Koerner
  • The Temple of Seti I, Abydos
  • signed and dated Ernst Koerner 1925. lower left
  • oil on canvas
  • 100.5 by 141cm., 39½ by 55½in.

Condition

Original canvas. Apart from a few tiny scattered specks of retouching visible under ultraviolet light, the paint surface is overall in good condition. Held in decorative plaster moulded frame painted silver with a linen slip.
"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.
NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Catalogue Note

Abydos is located west of the Nile, on the border between the valley and the desert, some 40 miles west of Dendera. As a burial ground of the ancient kings of Egypt, it became an important religious centre from Predynastic times onward. It is particularly associated with Osiris, the 'Lord of Abydos', whose mysteries were celebrated there annually. The ritual reenactment of Osiris' death and resurrection brought pilgrims from all over Egypt.

The temple of Seti I at Abydos is a mortuary temple, although Seti himself was buried in the Valley of the Kings. Situating the temple on the hallowed ground of Abydos enabled Seti to participate magically in the resurrection of Osiris for ever.

Seti's temple was completed by his son and successor Ramesses II. This gave Ramesses the opportunity to demonstrate his piety, and to carve his cartouches on yet another building. The temple facade is heavily restored. The inner part, especially the chapels dedicated to Seti himself, Ptah, Re-Harakhty, Amun-Re, Osiris, Isis, and Horus, was completed during Seti's lifetime and is beautifully decorated in the fine relief carving which is typical of his reign.