207
207

PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN

# - Franklin, Sir John--Broadsheet--

'DISCOVERY OF SIR JOHN FRANKLING [SIC]'. [LONDON]: RAGUE, PRINTER NO.2, COURT, BLACKFRIARS, [C.1851]
Estimate
1,5002,000
LOT SOLD. 5,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
207

PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN

# - Franklin, Sir John--Broadsheet--

'DISCOVERY OF SIR JOHN FRANKLING [SIC]'. [LONDON]: RAGUE, PRINTER NO.2, COURT, BLACKFRIARS, [C.1851]
Estimate
1,5002,000
LOT SOLD. 5,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

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# - Franklin, Sir John--Broadsheet--

'DISCOVERY OF SIR JOHN FRANKLING [SIC]'. [LONDON]: RAGUE, PRINTER NO.2, COURT, BLACKFRIARS, [C.1851]

Provenance

Captain Robert Pattman (1851-1912), commander of the Loch Torridon; given to Joseph W. Fawcett (1882-1976), who joined the ship as cabin boy in 1896; by descent to the present owner
(on the back of the frame is a letter from John Arlott of The Evening News (London), dated 4th August 1954, to Mr Fawcett, which reads "Thank you very much... for letting me see the broad sheet - which I much envy you. He does, in fact, mean the Arctic Table Bay - a loose piece of naming which occurs in the old accounts"

Literature

W. Gillies Ross, False Leads in the Franklin Search (Polar Record 39 (209): 131-160 (2003)); Owen, R. The Fate of Franklin (London, 1978), pp.320-1

Catalogue Note

a very rare broadsheet, relating a spurious sighting and meeting with sir john franklin and his crew on their ill-fated final voyage and claiming their imminent return to england. The broadsheet claims that Captain John Lowe of the Hull whaling ship Emma met Sir John Franklin and his crew in "perfect health", but "completely henned [sic] in among high mountains of Ice."

During the period 1847-1859 when the British Admiralty were arranging searches for Sir John Franklin and his expedition, the Admiralty and various newspapers received occasional reports of their discovery, both alive and dead. "Some were rumours of undisclosed origin, others were deliberate falsehoods intended to deceive. On a Saturday evening in late December 1850 a report of Franklin's safety and imminent return spread through London's West End... and was reported in The Weekly Times (29 December 1850)... unfortunately the information proved to be entirely false. The newspaper labelled it a 'heartless hoax.' According to Roderic Owen (The Fate of Franklin), a London printer by the name of Rague distributed a broadsheet about the above incident 'straight away', but as Owen gives a date of July 1851 - half a year after the Haymarket announcement - it must have been a separate incident [or Owen has the wrong date]... the location given (Latitude 68, Longitude 94), is a location east of Chantrey Inlet and the estuary of the Back River, and only about 70 miles southeast of the nearest point of King William Island, where the Franklin expedition foundered. The location cited, however, is some distance inland, and nowhere near any waterways visited by whalers." (Gillies Ross, pp.134-135)

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