55
55

THE PROPERTY OF A LADY

Barent Fabritius
Midden-Beemster near Hoorn 1624 - 1673 Amsterdam
A PORTRAIT OF A GENTLEMAN, HALF LENGTH, WEARING A BLACK COAT WITH A WHITE COLLAR
Estimate
15,00020,000
LOT SOLD. 24,250 EUR
JUMP TO LOT
55

THE PROPERTY OF A LADY

Barent Fabritius
Midden-Beemster near Hoorn 1624 - 1673 Amsterdam
A PORTRAIT OF A GENTLEMAN, HALF LENGTH, WEARING A BLACK COAT WITH A WHITE COLLAR
Estimate
15,00020,000
LOT SOLD. 24,250 EUR
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Old Master Paintings

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Amsterdam

Barent Fabritius
Midden-Beemster near Hoorn 1624 - 1673 Amsterdam
MIDDEN-BEEMSTER NEAR HOORN 1624 - 1673 AMSTERDAM
A PORTRAIT OF A GENTLEMAN, HALF LENGTH, WEARING A BLACK COAT WITH A WHITE COLLAR
indistinctly signed and dated centre right: B F (in compendium)abrit..s/ 16..
oil on panel, oval, unframed
31.2 by 23.2 cm.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

With Daan Cevat, London, by 1962;
Offered, London, Christie's, 30 November 1973, lot 67;
Offered, London, Christie's, 25 March 1977, lot 13 (all the above as by Carel Fabritius).

Exhibited

Amsterdam, Rijksmuseum, on loan, from 1962-1971;
Leiden, Stedelijk Museum de Lakenhal, Rondom Rembrandt, 11 April-16 June 1968, p. 9, no. 10, reproduced.

Literature

Bulletin Rijksmuseum, vol. X, 1962, p. 151 (as C. Fabritius);
W. Sumowski, 'Zu einem Gemälde von Carel Fabritius', in: Pantheon, vol. XXVI,  1968, p. 282, under note 2;
C. Brown, Carel Fabritius, Oxford 1981, p. 134, cat. no. R 13, reproduced fig. 71 (as Gerbrand Ban);
W. Sumowski, Gemälde der Rembrandt-Schüler, vol. II, Landau/Pfalz 1983, p. 926, no. 600, reproduced p. 978;
R.E.O. Ekkart, 'Gerbrand Ban', in: Bulletin van het Rijksmuseum, 39 (1991), p. 426-434, specially p. 432, note 19 (as probably B. Fabritius). 

Catalogue Note

This small informal study of a man with quite distinctive features, is one of the few portraits Barent Fabritius painted. Following his better-known brother Carel Fabritius, he places the sitter against a bright light background. This in combination with the use of the loose and broad brushwork gives the composition the characteristic chiaroscuro effect for which they, and especially Carel, were known (see for example the portrait of Abraham de Potter in the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, inv. no. A1591).

Although the signature is clearly visible, the absence of the initial of the first name has fuelled discussions about the attribution. It was Christopher Brown who was the first to remove the work from Carel Fabritius oeuvre.1  In 1991, Dr R.E.O. Ekkart in his turn, was the one who suggested a possible attribution to Barent Fabritius.2

According to the Christie's catalogue, x-rays of the panel establish that the panel was first used for the portrait of another sitter in a different pose. The style of the collar, evident in the x-rays, suggests that this first portrait was executed not later than 1640.


1. See Brown, under Literature.
2. See Ekkart, under Literature.

Old Master Paintings

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Amsterdam