Lot 200
  • 200

Herman Henstenburgh Hoorn 1667 - 1726

Estimate
12,000 - 18,000 GBP
bidding is closed

Description

  • Herman Henstenburgh
  • peacocks, a parrot and other fowl, watched by a spaniel, in a classical park landscape
  • signed and inscribed, lower left: H: Henstenb├║rgh/fecit.
  • gouache and touches of gum arabic, within black ink framing lines, on vellum laid down on paper

Condition

Framed. There is a small light brown spot stain, at the centre of the upper edge, but otherwise the sheet is in excellent condition, with the colours beautifully fresh and bright.
"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.
NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Catalogue Note

Herman Henstenburgh was one of three notable still-life and natural history artists from Hoorn, who established that town as a centre for their very distinctive, highly detailed and decorative watercolour and gouache style.  All three also, famously, followed parallel careers as pastry-bakers.  The eldest of these artists was Johannes Bronckhorst (1648-1727), who was Herman Henstenburgh's teacher as both artist and baker.  The trio was completed by Herman's son, Anton Henstenburgh (1695-1781). 

According to the near-contemporary chronicler, Johan van Gool, Henstenburgh started out by depicting birds and landscapes, and then broadened his repertoire after about 1695 to include flower and fruit pieces.  Van Gool went on to explain the extraordinary richness of Henstenburgh's colours by claiming that the artist had invented a new type of watercolour.  In the present work, this vivid palette is particularly apparent, thanks to the drawing's exceptionally good state of preservation.